NCPI Workmark
Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

Search Results


14 results for Ocracoke--History
Currently viewing results 1 - 14
PAGE OF 1
Record #:
6935
Author(s):
Abstract:
Muzel Bryant was born on Ocracoke on March 12, 1904. She traces her lineage on the island back to the Civil War. At the war's close in 1865, all former slaves left the island. Her grandparents were the only two African Americans to move from the mainland to Ocracoke. Bryant has lived off the island only once when she worked during her teenage years in Philadelphia. Today, at the age of 100, she is an important link to Outer Banks history.
Source:
Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue , Holiday 2004, p20-23, il, por Periodical Website
Full Text:
Record #:
7039
Author(s):
Abstract:
Williams describes an incident of World War II having a North Carolina connection. On May 11, 1942, off the North Carolina coast, the German submarine U-558 sank HMS Bedfordshire, a British naval ship on submarine patrol. All thirty-seven British sailors were killed. Days later four bodies from the ship washed up on Ocracoke Island. Residents buried the four in a small plot. Later the United States ceded the land to England in perpetuity for one dollar. Each May memorial services are held there by military representatives from Canada, England, and the United States.
Source:
Record #:
10733
Author(s):
Abstract:
The German submarine U-558 sank HMS Bedfordshire, a British naval ship on submarine patrol duty off Ocracoke Island in May 1942, killing thirty-seven British sailors. Four bodies from the ship washed up on Ocracoke Island. Residents buried them in a small plot. Later, the United States ceded the land to England in perpetuity for one dollar.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 76 Issue 9, Feb 2009, p31-32, 34-35, il, por Periodical Website
Full Text:
Record #:
10740
Author(s):
Abstract:
During World War II England sent many ships to patrol the northeast coast of the United States, especially the area between Norfolk and Cape Hatteras. One such patrol ship, The H.M.S. BEDFORDSHIRE, was sunk by German submarines off Ocracoke Island and the bodies of four of its crewmen washed ashore on May 14, 1942. A local resident discovered the bodies and notified the Coast Guard who recovered the bodies, brought them into the village, and arranged for identification. Lt. Aycock Brown, USN, flew in from Norfolk to identify the bodies, one of which he recognized as Lt. Thomas Cunningham, a man with whom he had shared a meal in Norfolk only three days before the sinking of the Bedfordshire. Seaman Stanley Craig was wearing an identification tag and the other two bodies remain unidentified. The seamen were buried on land donated by Mrs. Alice Williams and given a memorial service organized by Mr. and Mrs. Theodore Rondthaler. Yearly memorial services still take place, and the gravesite is maintained by the U.S. Coast Guard and the Ocracoke Boy Scouts.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 37 Issue 21, Apr 1970, p9, il
Full Text:
Record #:
15216
Abstract:
To the majority of North Carolinians, Ocracoke Island is merely a place for hunting and fishing, but the island provides so much more in history and culture. The purported home of the notorious Blackbeard, Ocracoke also provided the commercial key to North Carolina with Ocracoke Inlet. Ocracoke was also the scene of many stirring Revolutionary sea fights among vessels. Even after the hostilities ceased and the lighthouse was built, Ocracoke continued to thrive in trade.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 7 Issue 12, Aug 1939, p6-8, 29-30, f
Subject(s):
Full Text:
Record #:
19234
Author(s):
Abstract:
Although Ocracoke village may seem like a solitary community, it has had a long history of interesting interactions spanning from Sir Walter Raleigh's expeditions to Blackbeard and German torpedoes.
Source:
Subject(s):
Record #:
24693
Author(s):
Abstract:
The author discusses the development set to take place on Ocracoke, including a newly paved road that would bring in more tourists and change the quaint atmosphere of the area.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 22 Issue 25, May 1955, p13, 29, il
Full Text:
Record #:
32208
Author(s):
Abstract:
Ocracoke brogue is an English dialect particular to the island of Ocracoke in North Carolina’s Outer Banks. Certain features of pronunciation, grammar and vocabulary reflect the island’s history, culture, and isolation. This article investigates how Ocracoke’s unique dialect has evolved with the island’s changing demographics.
Source:
Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue 1, Winter 2018, p40-44, il, por, f Periodical Website
Record #:
35917
Author(s):
Abstract:
The author suggested Italian explorer Amerigo Vespucci could not have imagined what would become of the sparse strip of land standing between the Atlantic Ocean and Coastal mainland. How much has become of the Outer Banks was in its attraction power to residents and visitors, activities like sand surfing and sailing, hand gliding and sunbathing.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 9 Issue 3, Mar 1981, p50-55
Record #:
35945
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Sea Chest staff continued the Weather Station’s briny borne adventures in these entries, chronicled between March-June 1876. Wedged between the ordinary reports of barometric pressure was the extraordinary three week disappearance of Private Hanes. To illustrate the difference between charting the weather during the 19th century and current methods, included were pictures of modern weather forecasting equipment.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 1 Issue 3, Spring 1974, p64-70
Record #:
35952
Abstract:
Remnants of the ship, sunk between Hatteras Island and Ocracoke in 1913, were reputedly left along the coast. Pieces of the wreckage could also be perceived in its survivors and those left behind, like Mrs. Martha Barnett, to tell the tale.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 2 Issue 1, Summer 1974, p57
Record #:
36014
Author(s):
Abstract:
Of personal interest to the author were also items of historical interest. Up close and personal was the view that he offered of sunken ships, as well as the marine life that lived around them. As visual illustration was a map locating the wrecked watercrafts, which included a German submarine. Accompanying the map was a brief description of each: an old boiler, LST#741, Richmond, Kyzickes, Zane Gray, U-85, and York.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 1 Issue 1, Spring/Summer 1980, p10-13, map
Record #:
38119
Author(s):
Abstract:
From the mystique built up around Blackbeard the past three centuries, the scant details that can be defined as truth have been coated with generous layers of fiction. Defining his life and death as more a series of questions than statements are speculations such as the location of his treasure and real name. Counted as closer to the truth by historical interpreters and members of the North Carolina Historical Society are Blackbeard’s ties with Bath and Colonial administrative officials. Contributing also to truth’s pursuit are the Blackbeard Jamboree. This festival includes activities such as seafaring and tavern songs and camps that reflect 17th and 18th-century maritime lifeways.
Record #:
39264
Author(s):
Abstract:
History of the Smallwood Family; Past and Present History of Aurora, NC; Facts About Bath, NC; List of other articles written by Robert Tripp Bonner that appeared in the Washington Progress.
Source:
Pamteco Tracings (NoCar F262.B37 P35), Vol. 14 Issue No. 1, June 1998, p45-49