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9 results for Explorers
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Record #:
2193
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Abstract:
Prior to 1662 there were no accurate maps of the Carolina coast from Cape Lookout to Port Royal Sound. Six voyages of exploration between 1662 and 1667 added detailed descriptions of previously unknown areas to existing maps.
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Tributaries (NoCar Ref VK 24 N8 T74), Vol. Issue 4, Oct 1994, p21-29, il, f
Record #:
8377
Author(s):
Abstract:
Simon Ferdinando was arrested in 1578 and tried for piracy. Later that year he was taken from prison, and, because of his superb nautical talents, was employed to accompany Sir Humphrey Gilbert on the first voyage to exploit America for England. In 1580, Ferdinando explored the coastline of North America and guided colonial expeditions, some to the North Carolina coast. What is now Oregon Inlet used to be named “Port Ferdinando.” Ferdinando became master and pilot of the ship which carried Sir Walter Raleigh's agents to Carolina and back. When he grew too old to go to sea he became an advisor to the newly chartered East India Company.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 51 Issue 12, May 1984, p12, por
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Record #:
12639
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Abstract:
Engaged in Elizabethan efforts to colonize the New World on behalf of England, Portuguese native, Simon Ferdinando, made several trans-Atlantic voyages to the Americas. Tried and convicted as a pirate in 1578, Ferdinando was spared from the gallows and forced into a navigation position under Sir Humphrey Gilbert. After returning from several successful voyages, Ferdinando was granted the position, Commander of the English Expedition Fleet, continuing England's exploitation of the Americas via ship. Upon retirement, Ferdinando became an advisor to the newly chartered East India Company.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 30 Issue 15, Dec 1962, p9, il
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Record #:
22463
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This article explores the possibility that 17th century German explorer John Lederer, reached Bertie County, North Carolina during his 1670 expedition into the Piedmont of North Carolina. Using prior analysis of Lederer's expedition as well as historical documentation, the author approximates the route and extent of the expedition.
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Record #:
35776
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Abstract:
Winemaking, starting during the 16th century, had become an important state and national industry by the 19th. Winemakers that contributed to its state and national prominence included Paul Garrett. In fact, by the early twentieth century, his five wineries were producing the best-selling brand in the America, “Virginia Dare.” As for modern day winemakers Stanley believed spurred this tradition’s comeback, they included Duplin Wine Cellars in Rose Hill.
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Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 7 Issue 6, Oct 1979, p26-28
Record #:
36565
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Abstract:
Conquistador Juan Pardo intended to offer Spain a land route from the Appalachia to Mexico, where the country had established silver mines. The threat of Indian attacks at the Great Smokies’ slopes in Tennessee prompted Pardo to abandon the mission and his three forts. The accompanying image of a map created during the time period illustrates the land area representing the present day Southeastern states where Pardo conducted his two expeditions.
Record #:
35917
Author(s):
Abstract:
The author suggested Italian explorer Amerigo Vespucci could not have imagined what would become of the sparse strip of land standing between the Atlantic Ocean and Coastal mainland. How much has become of the Outer Banks was in its attraction power to residents and visitors, activities like sand surfing and sailing, hand gliding and sunbathing.
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Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 9 Issue 3, Mar 1981, p50-55
Record #:
36020
Abstract:
Described were three ways how the “oldest horse in North America” arrived on Outer Banks, all taking place during Elizabeth I’s reign. The population on Shackleford Banks and Currituck, low because of laws passed since the 1930s, could be considered valuable because of their demand. As for their value to the residents, called Bankers, that couldn’t be measured monetarily.
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Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 2 Issue 1, Fall/Winter 1982, p8-10
Record #:
36212
Author(s):
Abstract:
An aspect of exploration that may not be included in history texts is the introduction of living things from other places into the land being explored, such as insects and plants. While they may be harmless, the author places emphasis on those considered invasive, or hitchhikers. The author noted that invasive plants and animals can inflict economic and environmental damage. Examples of invasive insects included Colorado potato beetle and Silverleaf whitefly. As for invasive plants, examples were Emerald ash borer and Crapemyrtle bark scale.
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