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67 results for Hatteras Island--History
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Record #:
78
Abstract:
World War I flying ace Billy Mitchell made aviation history when he bombed battleships off Hatteras in 1923.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 59 Issue 7, Dec 1991, p14-15, il, por
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Record #:
7541
Abstract:
Maurice Bernard Folb first came to Hatteras Island in 1920. He was a Chief Pharmacist's Mate with the U.S. Navy and was stationed at Cape Hatteras for six years and ten months. Folb gave medical attention to all who needed it, delivering babies and treating various diseases. In this SEA CHEST interview, he discusses traveling about the island to treat patients, the wreck of the Carroll A. Deering, the diphtheria epidemic, and recreation on the island.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 1 Issue 1, Spring/Summer 1973, p43-51, il
Record #:
7543
Author(s):
Abstract:
Weather observations have been taken on Hatteras Island since 1874. Much of the information on this period is contained in the weather station's log books, which are housed at the Cape Hatteras Weather Service. The books contain material on weather, shipwrecks, and local happenings. THE SEA CHEST staff compiled entries from 1874 and 1875 to give the reader a feel for what life at a weather station was like.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 1 Issue 1, Spring/Summer 1973, p20-30, il
Record #:
7542
Author(s):
Abstract:
Clifford Wade was born on Hatteras Island on November 14, 1882 and at present is the island's oldest resident. At the age of twelve he went to work pound net fishing and later worked in the Lightship Service. Wade describes his experiences in the Great August Storm of 1899 and watching General Billy Mitchell sink two battleships with air power off Hatteras Island in 1923.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 1 Issue 1, Spring/Summer 1973, p55
Record #:
7552
Author(s):
Abstract:
Weather observations have been taken on Hatteras Island since 1874. Much of the information on this period is contained in the weather station's log books, which are housed at the Cape Hatteras Weather Service. The books contain material on weather, shipwrecks, and local happenings. THE SEA CHEST staff continues the compilation of entries. This issue covers the year 1876.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 1 Issue 3, Spring 1974, p64-70, il
Record #:
7548
Author(s):
Abstract:
Weather observations have been taken on Hatteras Island since 1874. Much of the information on this period is contained in the weather station's log books, which are housed at the Cape Hatteras Weather Service. The books contain material on weather, shipwrecks, and local happenings. The SEA CHEST staff continues the entries started in the Spring/Summer issue. This issue's compilation covers 1875 to 1879.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 1 Issue 2, Fall 1973, p49-60, il
Record #:
7550
Author(s):
Abstract:
Jennette interviewed his grandmothers, Mrs. Brittie Burrus and Mrs. Annie Stowe, for information on what life on Hatteras Island was like in the early days of the 20th-century. Without stores to depend on, islanders raised their own fruits, vegetables, and meat. Everyone made their quilts and clothes, and mail was delivered by boat.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 1 Issue 3, Spring 1974, p29-31, il
Record #:
7559
Author(s):
Abstract:
Weather observations have been taken on Hatteras Island since 1874. Much of the information on this period is contained in the weather station's log books, which are housed at the Cape Hatteras Weather Service. The books contain material on weather, shipwrecks, and local happenings. The SEA CHEST staff continues the compilation of entries. This issue continues coverage of the year 1876.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 2 Issue 1, Summer 1974, p51-55
Record #:
7564
Author(s):
Abstract:
The SEA CHEST staff continues the compilation of entries contained in the weather station's log books which are housed at the Cape Hatteras Weather Service. This issue contains selected observations for the years 1875 and 1876.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 3 Issue 2, Spring 1976, p16-19, il
Record #:
7568
Author(s):
Abstract:
Maurice Bernard Folb, Chief Pharmacist's Mate with the U.S. Navy, first came to Hatteras Island in 1920. In this SEA CHEST interview, he talks about his arrival in Buxton, midwives and their remedies, dipping vats and cattle drives, baseball, and other pastimes.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 3 Issue 2, Spring 1976, p48-57, il
Record #:
8025
Author(s):
Abstract:
Changes are occurring on Hatteras Island. One tradition that is vanishing from the Hatteras waterfront, as fisherman switch to gill nets, is haul seining. Another change is the decline in boat slips for commercial fishermen. In the last twenty-five years over 100 boat slips have been lost to private developers, and commercial fishing captains are competing for the 50 slips remaining in Hatteras. Fish houses have declined from six to two recently. To help fishermen, the Dare County Commissioners are petitioning the General Assembly to give tax breaks to fishermen as they do to farmers. Green explores the history of the Hatteras community from 1846 to the present.
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Record #:
8238
Author(s):
Abstract:
In the 19th-century the United States Weather Bureau established several weather stations and observation posts throughout North Carolina and along the coast. The earliest coastal station was established in Wilmington in 1871, and has been in continuous operation since. A second station was built at Cape Hatteras in 1874, followed by five others up and down the coast. These stations played an important role in early storm and hurricane tracking and were the first weather warning systems for coastal residents. Harrison recounts the history of the Cape Hatteras Station.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 74 Issue 6, Nov 2006, p26-28, 30, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
9607
Author(s):
Abstract:
Before 1950 on Hatteras Island, Highway 12 was not paved, Bonner Bridge wasn't built, the Cape Hatteras National Seashore had not been created, and there were few motels. In 1952, John Edgar and Anne Miller Hooper began building a motel at Buxton and called it the Lighthouse View Court motel. Harrison recounts the growth of the family business which is now in its fourth generation.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 75 Issue 6, Nov 2007, p80-82, 84, 86, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
23889
Author(s):
Abstract:
Outer Bank's oldest store, Burrus Red & White Supermarket, is located at the southern end of Hatteras Island. For nearly 150 years, the store has served the small community in Hatteras and remains an important part of the town's heritage.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 82 Issue 12, May 2015, p84-90, il, por, map Periodical Website
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Record #:
22432
Author(s):
Abstract:
The isolated situation and culture of Hatteras Island, North Carolina has contributed to the preservation of speech patterns characteristic of the early English and Scottish inhabitants of the island.
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