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12 results for Sea Chest Staff
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Record #:
7543
Author(s):
Abstract:
Weather observations have been taken on Hatteras Island since 1874. Much of the information on this period is contained in the weather station's log books, which are housed at the Cape Hatteras Weather Service. The books contain material on weather, shipwrecks, and local happenings. THE SEA CHEST staff compiled entries from 1874 and 1875 to give the reader a feel for what life at a weather station was like.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 1 Issue 1, Spring/Summer 1973, p20-30, il
Record #:
7545
Author(s):
Abstract:
Bill Dillon, Dare County commissioner, discusses the county's problems with ocean erosion and why he feels the National Park Service could do more to alleviate the problem.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 1 Issue 2, Fall 1973, p5-17, il
Record #:
7552
Author(s):
Abstract:
Weather observations have been taken on Hatteras Island since 1874. Much of the information on this period is contained in the weather station's log books, which are housed at the Cape Hatteras Weather Service. The books contain material on weather, shipwrecks, and local happenings. THE SEA CHEST staff continues the compilation of entries. This issue covers the year 1876.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 1 Issue 3, Spring 1974, p64-70, il
Record #:
7548
Author(s):
Abstract:
Weather observations have been taken on Hatteras Island since 1874. Much of the information on this period is contained in the weather station's log books, which are housed at the Cape Hatteras Weather Service. The books contain material on weather, shipwrecks, and local happenings. The SEA CHEST staff continues the entries started in the Spring/Summer issue. This issue's compilation covers 1875 to 1879.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 1 Issue 2, Fall 1973, p49-60, il
Record #:
7559
Author(s):
Abstract:
Weather observations have been taken on Hatteras Island since 1874. Much of the information on this period is contained in the weather station's log books, which are housed at the Cape Hatteras Weather Service. The books contain material on weather, shipwrecks, and local happenings. The SEA CHEST staff continues the compilation of entries. This issue continues coverage of the year 1876.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 2 Issue 1, Summer 1974, p51-55
Record #:
7564
Author(s):
Abstract:
The SEA CHEST staff continues the compilation of entries contained in the weather station's log books which are housed at the Cape Hatteras Weather Service. This issue contains selected observations for the years 1875 and 1876.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 3 Issue 2, Spring 1976, p16-19, il
Record #:
7563
Author(s):
Abstract:
Gordon Watts is the state underwater archaeologist and one of the discoverers of the MONITOR. In this SEA CHEST interview, he discusses the history of the MONITOR and how it was found.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 3 Issue 2, Spring 1976, p2-13, il, map
Subject(s):
Record #:
7575
Author(s):
Abstract:
Although coastal life-saving activities date back to 1848 in New Jersey and New York, the United States Life-Saving Service was not officially established until April 20, 1871. Construction of the first three of eleven life-saving stations on Hatteras Island began in 1874. Stations were usually built five to seven miles apart to insure as much coverage of the beach as possible. The article includes a map which locates the eleven stations and a chart which positions the stations by longitude and latitude.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 4 Issue 2, Winter 1977, p3-6, il, map
Record #:
7578
Author(s):
Abstract:
Before the lifesaving stations were manned fulltime in 1905, they operated on an active season and inactive season. Active meant fulltime operation between September 1 and May 1, and inactive meant the summer months when only the keeper was on duty. This article describes station activities for every day of the week; a beach apparatus drill by the keeper and seven surfmen; beach patrols and tower watches; equipment used for rescues; and surfboats.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 4 Issue 2, Winter 1977, p15-19, 22-23, 26-27, il
Record #:
7580
Author(s):
Abstract:
Charles T. Williams II was born on Hatteras Island in 1892. When he was 83, he wrote a book about the village of Avon, titled The Kinnakeeter. Williams was never in the lifesaving service, but he hung around the stations as much as he could when he was young. He recounts how the beach patrols and watches worked, riding on beach patrol with his uncle Benjamin Scarborough, and activities about the stations around the turn of the century.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 4 Issue 2, Winter 1977, p24-25
Record #:
7576
Author(s):
Abstract:
This article is a compilation of the keepers and crews who manned the eleven life-saving stations on Hatteras Island between 1874 and 1914. The stations are Oregon Inlet, Pea Island, New Inlet, Chicamacomico, Gull Shore, Little Kinnakeet, Big Kinnakeet, Cape Hatteras, Creeds Hill, and Durants.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 4 Issue 2, Winter 1977, p49-62, il, bibl
Record #:
7577
Author(s):
Abstract:
Hatteras Island lifesaving stations were two-story buildings. This article discusses how the rooms were used for crew and equipment storage and how the buildings were constructed. Included is a complete set of architectural plans for these buildings.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 4 Issue 2, Winter 1977, p7-14, il