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6 results for Scuppernong grapes
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Record #:
15514
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Gardner, head of the Department of Agriculture at State College, relates interesting information about the Scuppernong grape. While no one seems to know how they got there, it appears the grape was first planted in Tyrrell County. The grape takes its name from the Scuppernong River because of the numerous plantings along its shores.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 2 Issue 36, Feb 1935, p4, 24, il
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Record #:
15711
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Falls relates interesting information about the Scuppernong grape, which is most popularly used for jelly or for winemaking. The grape is probably indigenous to North Carolina and it grows singly or in small clusters. The color varies from a modest terra vert to a suntan with freckles. Its skin is tough and its juice and flesh musky-sweet. The best time for harvesting is between the first and last week of September.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 22 Issue 6, Aug 1954, p10, 40, il
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Record #:
31723
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The author quickly outlines the history of wine making in North Carolina before highlighting some of the state’s current offerings. From large scale operations like that of the Biltmore Estate Winery to the small outfits like The Teensy Winery in Union Mills, production styles in North Carolina range from Traditional European style to traditional Tar Heel scuppernong varieties.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 59 Issue 3, Aug 1991, p18-21, il
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Record #:
33204
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The Combination of industry and agriculture have made Aberdeen a prosperous and progressive all-year-round town.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 6 Issue 21, Oct 1938, p26-32, il
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Record #:
35776
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Winemaking, starting during the 16th century, had become an important state and national industry by the 19th. Winemakers that contributed to its state and national prominence included Paul Garrett. In fact, by the early twentieth century, his five wineries were producing the best-selling brand in the America, “Virginia Dare.” As for modern day winemakers Stanley believed spurred this tradition’s comeback, they included Duplin Wine Cellars in Rose Hill.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 7 Issue 6, Oct 1979, p26-28
Record #:
37436
Author(s):
Abstract:
Patent Office report about the white and black grape known as ‘Scuppernong,’ and its culture in northeastern North Carolina.
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