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16 results for Cape Fear River--History
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Record #:
4229
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Abstract:
The Cape Fear River is a history-filled waterway, having seen early European explorers, including English, French, and Spanish ply its waters; bustling commerce, especially naval stores from 1720 to the Civil War; and warfare, including Spanish harassment during the 18th-century and the Union's blockade during the Civil War. Today it is a quiet stream, inviting travelers back through time.
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Record #:
12794
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Between 1913 and the early 1930s, three locks and dams were constructed in the Cape Fear River. Located at King's Bluff, Elizabethtown, and south of Fayetteville, the locks modernized the river, which increased navigability as well as commerce.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 28 Issue 2, June 1960, p12, il
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Record #:
12837
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Seventy-five years ago, James Sprunt, author of Chronicles of the Cape Fear, made a boat trip down the river from Wilmington, recording information for his book, Tales of the Cape Fear. Contained in the article are excerpts from this book, describing points of interest as they appeared during that period.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 28 Issue 17, Jan 1961, p13-15
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Record #:
24522
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This article recounts the Confederate’s attempt to keep Union ships out of the Cape Fear River using three ironclads: CSS NORTH CAROLINA (ship), CSS RALEIGH (ship), and CSS WILMINGTON (ship).
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 45 Issue 3, August 1977, p16-18, 35, il, por
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Record #:
24518
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This article recounts the time when the Confederate Navy confronted a Yankee fleet on the open seas outside of the Cape Fear River. CSS RALEIGH (ship) was used in an effort to clear Onslow Bay of Union blockaders.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 45 Issue 2, July 1977, p8-10, 44, il, por
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Record #:
24558
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Abstract:
The Elwell Ferry is one of the last inland river ferries in North Carolina and is located between state highways 53 and 87 in Bladen County and crosses the Cape Fear River. The history of the ferry is presented in this article.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 39 Issue 16, January 1972, p6-7, il
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Record #:
24654
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Abstract:
Anecdotal historical information is provided about Fort Caswell, a fortification on the mouth of the Cape Fear River used for guarding the main seaway into in North Carolina.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 26 Issue 25, May 1959, p11-12, il, map
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Record #:
16058
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William Hilton explored the Cape Fear River area in August 1662. His discoveries of a fertile land encouraged additional New England settlers to arrive in late 1663. Permanent settlement would not be established until 1666, when the site of Charles Town reached 800 individuals.
Source:
Tar Heel Junior Historian (NoCar F 251 T3x), Vol. 9 Issue 1-3, Mar 1971, p11-12, il
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Record #:
16179
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Cape Fear River connected communities in eastern Carolina's coastal plain. Transportation transformed from sail and rowboats to steamboats in the 19th-century. River traffic again evolved in the early 19th-century when motorized boat traffic replaced steamboats. Regardless of propulsion, river traffic promoted growth of two of the river's largest cities, Fayetteville and Wilmington.
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Record #:
13152
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The wall in the title refers to the area in North Carolina where the soft sedimentary rock of the Coastal Plain meets the hard crystalline rock of the Piedmont. Such a meeting causes river rapids, such as Smiley's Falls in the Cape Fear River. For merchants and farmers living upstream in the 19th-century, the rapids blocked commercial traffic and goods from getting to market. Earley describes North Carolina's effort to overcome the rapids and open the river to traffic.
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Record #:
16052
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Spanish permanent settlement was first founded in Florida but thirty years before that explorer Lucas Vasquez de Ayllon sailed from the West Indies to the Cape Fear River. Ayllon attempted to settle in the state but after experiencing difficulties the Spaniard moved his group to San Miguel in South Carolina. Conditions did not improve and after Ayllon died the settlement failed.
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Record #:
28657
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1865 began a period of political reconstruction in North Carolina, as well as improvements to Wilmington, the largest port in the state. The United States Army Corps of Engineers performed all major improvements on the Cape Fear River to enhance Wilmington’s commercial and economic position.
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Record #:
34913
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Captain Freddie Mims offers daily tours of the Cape Fear River which highlight the area’s history and notable people. A history buff, Mims found that people were more interested in learning about the Cape Fear River than local fishing spots. He swapped the tour’s focus from fishing to history and it has taken off.
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CityView (NoCar F 264.T3 W4), Vol. Issue , April 2017, p12-16, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
35732
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Abstract:
Megivern proposed that Tom Wright Jr. played a prominent role in making Wilmington a must see for NC’s coast travelers. That was done chiefly by his crowning achievement, Chandler’s Wharf. It bore evidence of the town’s maritime history in watercraft such the Harry W. Adams. For those seeking historic landmarks on land, there were sites such as the oldest building, now housing a nautical library, and an 1883 cooper’s home that became a restaurant.
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Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 7 Issue 3, May/June 1979, p64-65
Record #:
35776
Author(s):
Abstract:
Winemaking, starting during the 16th century, had become an important state and national industry by the 19th. Winemakers that contributed to its state and national prominence included Paul Garrett. In fact, by the early twentieth century, his five wineries were producing the best-selling brand in the America, “Virginia Dare.” As for modern day winemakers Stanley believed spurred this tradition’s comeback, they included Duplin Wine Cellars in Rose Hill.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 7 Issue 6, Oct 1979, p26-28