NCPI Workmark
Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

Search Results


13 results for North Carolina--History--Civil War, 1861-1865--Naval operations--Confederate
Currently viewing results 1 - 13
PAGE OF 1
Record #:
9905
Author(s):
Abstract:
On July 9, 1862, Company B of the First Cavalry (Ninth North Carolina Regiment), under the temporary command of Lieutenant Alexander B. Andrews, participated in the first ever account of Cavalry versus Naval Vessels, successfully deterring three Federal gun-boats from destroying railroad bridges on the Roanoke river near Weldon. The events, including the actual encounter that took place near Hamilton, N.C. at Rainbow Banks (later Fort Branch), are told in Andrews own words, as quoted from the official history of the First Cavalry.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 40 Issue 2, June 1972, p7-9, il, por
Full Text:
Record #:
10792
Author(s):
Abstract:
The C.S.S. NEUSE, a Confederate ironclad constructed in Kinston, has been recovered. The ship sank in 1865 when Union soldiers invaded Kinston and Joseph H. Price, the boat's commander, ordered the vessel destroyed to prevent capture. The ship, currently scheduled for restoration work, was excavated in 1961.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 34 Issue 22, Apr 1967, p15-16, il
Full Text:
Record #:
12643
Author(s):
Abstract:
Prize money was a factor in the intrepidity and ingenuity of sailors during the Civil War as captured vessels yielded high rewards for the dominant crews. Spread unevenly amongst the men, in accordance with rank, captains received up to five figures whereas cabin boys, three. The EOLUS and the USS MEMPHIS are used as examples in this article.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 30 Issue 15, Dec 1962, p11, il
Full Text:
Record #:
12864
Author(s):
Abstract:
A two-part series discussing the construction the CSS North Carolina and CSS Raleigh, two ironclads built for defense of Confederate interests at Wilmington, this article offers construction information and factors effecting the timing and completion of the rams.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 27 Issue 15, Dec 1959, p9, 12, il
Full Text:
Record #:
12868
Author(s):
Abstract:
The second article in a two part series discussing the construction the CSS North Carolina and CSS Raleigh, two ironclads constructed to break the Union blockade in North Carolina.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 27 Issue 16, Jan 1960, p13-14, il
Full Text:
Record #:
13369
Author(s):
Abstract:
The stretch of ocean that extends from Topsail Inlet, North Carolina to Georgetown, South Carolina, is an unmarked grave for a squadron of ships that sailed and fought for the Confederacy. A treasure ship lies off Wrightsville Beach with Robert E. Lee's undelivered gift.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 21 Issue 13, Aug 1953, p3-4, 14, il
Full Text:
Record #:
20890
Abstract:
The C.S.S. Neuse was one of two ironclads constructed in eastern North Carolina sounds. Ironclads were an important component of the Confederate Navy's strategy to defeat the Union during the Civil War. The author describes the history of the vessel from commission in 1862 to its excavation in 1961.
Record #:
24522
Author(s):
Abstract:
This article recounts the Confederate’s attempt to keep Union ships out of the Cape Fear River using three ironclads: CSS NORTH CAROLINA (ship), CSS RALEIGH (ship), and CSS WILMINGTON (ship).
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 45 Issue 3, August 1977, p16-18, 35, il, por
Full Text:
Record #:
28682
Author(s):
Abstract:
In March of 1864, a dispute between Confederate Army and Navy authorities in the Department of the Cape Fear led to an armed confrontation on the Wilmington waterfront. Though the incident ended without bloodshed, the animosity lingered and had a significant negative effect on the Confederate defense of the Lower Cape Fear in 1865.
Source:
Lower Cape Fear Historical Society Bulletin (NoCar F 262 C2 L6x), Vol. 37 Issue 2, March 1993, p1-7, il, por, bibl, f
Full Text:
Record #:
28271
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Navy of the Confederacy lacked success in the Civil War as a result of the lack of internal transportation due to military action. Even in the days immediately after Fort Fisher’s fall, blockade runners still evaded capture in and out of Wilmington.
Record #:
34655
Author(s):
Abstract:
Drawing on primary accounts, this article addresses the cruise of the Confederate blockade runner CSS NASHVILLE between October 1861 and February 1862. Beginning in Bermuda, NASHVILLE sailed for Beaufort, NC and encountered Union ships outside the harbor. Using a false flag, NASHVILLE passed by the enemy vessel. The Union sailors soon discovered the ruse and began firing at the blockade runner. NASHVILLE successfully evaded the shots and sought cover at Fort Macon, proceeding to Morehead City. Various other vessels saw the encounter and commented on the skill of the crew. NASHVILLE was eventually sold for private use.
Source:
The Researcher (NoCar F 262 C23 R47), Vol. 17 Issue 2, Winter 2001, p19-23, il
Record #:
34709
Author(s):
Abstract:
In early November 1861, French Man-of-War PRONY was stranded near Ocracoke Inlet. Catching sight of the vessel, the master of USS UNDERWRITER sent message they would provide aid. Unable to reach the vessel, however, UNDERWRITER retreated leaving PRONY vulnerable to attack. Confederate forces arrived on the scene and instead of attacking, offered assistance. While PRONY was not rescued, the crew were taken onboard CSS CURLEW and brought to New Bern.
Source:
Record #:
34744
Author(s):
Abstract:
In February 1862, two Beaufort residents successfully ran the Union blockade of Beaufort on board the CSS NASHVILLE. Used for transporting goods, NASHVILLE would continue to serve as a blockade runner for Confederate forces. In March, NASHVILLE transported arms and munitions across the blockade at the Cape Fear River; sailed into Nassau, and successfully bypassed Union sailors at the port of Georgetown, South Carolina.
Source:
The Researcher (NoCar F 262 C23 R47), Vol. 22 Issue 1, Spring/Summer 2006, p5-6, il