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9 results for North Carolina--History--Civil War, 1861-1865--Union naval operations
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Record #:
18921
Author(s):
Abstract:
During the Civil War, Lieut. William B. Cushing, an intrepid and courageous Union naval officer, carried out daring exploits in North Carolina. Several did not succeed, such as the attempts to capture the commanders at Fort Fisher and Fort Johnson. His greatest accomplishment was planning and carrying out the sinking of the Confederate ram Albemarle on the Roanoke River near Plymouth.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 10 Issue 33, Jan 1943, p3, 20
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Record #:
24522
Author(s):
Abstract:
This article recounts the Confederate’s attempt to keep Union ships out of the Cape Fear River using three ironclads: CSS NORTH CAROLINA (ship), CSS RALEIGH (ship), and CSS WILMINGTON (ship).
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 45 Issue 3, August 1977, p16-18, 35, il, por
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Record #:
24529
Abstract:
Yankee sailor William B. Cushing sank the CSS ALBEMARLE (ship) in 1864 with a torpedo. This article recounts the methods used to attack the ironclad.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 45 Issue 5, October 1977, p18-21, il, por
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Record #:
24632
Author(s):
Abstract:
During the Civil War, North Carolina was the only state to go directly into the business of blockade running to import war materials through the Union blockade and into Wilmington.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 26 Issue 16, January 1959, p7, 14, il
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Record #:
34623
Author(s):
Abstract:
Lt. William Barker Cushing was a Union naval officer who, in 1862, took the gunboat USS ELLIS up the New River to attack any blockade runners upstream and raid Jacksonville. Cushing had been given ELLIS in October 1862 while under orders to watch Bogue Inlet. The 200 ton ELLIS, captured from Confederate forces the spring before, was outfit with two 32-pound guns and a crew of 30 men. In late November, 1862, Cushing entered the New River and proceeded towards Jacksonville. Arriving at the town, Cushing and his men captured several slaves, arms, clothing, and two sailing schooners. On return to the river mouth, Confederate cavalry followed the flotilla and fired on the sailors. An ambush was prepared further down river but was prematurely initiated, giving Cushing time to engage those on shore. ELLIS’ guns proved more powerful and the Confederate forces retreated. Cushing set out towards the river mouth only to ground before reaching New River inlet. Confederate forces returned and soon destroyed ELLIS, however Cushing and his men were able to escape on one of the schooners.
Source:
The Researcher (NoCar F 262 C23 R47), Vol. 16 Issue 1, Winter 2000, p17-25, il, por, map
Record #:
34620
Author(s):
Abstract:
The most successful Union operations conducted during the Civil War were those launched along the Outer Banks and inland waters in 1861 and 1862. Their success was due, in large part, to the inexperience of Confederate naval forces. Despite the general disorganization and inexperience of the U.S. Navy, Union officials understood the significance of waterways as a means to entering Southern states and delaying troop resupply. Union strategist George McClellan planned a number of amphibious operations on major waterways which would disrupt rail and communications in the South. These goals resulted in a plan to take control of Hatteras Inlet.
Source:
The Researcher (NoCar F 262 C23 R47), Vol. 16 Issue 1, Winter 2000, p4-6, il, por
Record #:
34621
Author(s):
Abstract:
The coastal sounds of North Carolina made ideal anchorages for vessels looking to avoid Atlantic storms and were used by Confederate forces as a base for naval operations. Adjacent terrestrial defenses were constructed to protect these anchorages, but were poorly manned and supplied. In 1861, the Union led an expedition against Hatteras Inlet fortifications, followed by attacks on Roanoke Island, New Bern, and Fort Macon. The fall of these fortifications increased Union strength in Eastern North Carolina and provided Union forces with protected naval bases they would utilize through the end of the war.
Source:
The Researcher (NoCar F 262 C23 R47), Vol. 16 Issue 1, Winter 2000, p7-12, f
Record #:
34709
Author(s):
Abstract:
In early November 1861, French Man-of-War PRONY was stranded near Ocracoke Inlet. Catching sight of the vessel, the master of USS UNDERWRITER sent message they would provide aid. Unable to reach the vessel, however, UNDERWRITER retreated leaving PRONY vulnerable to attack. Confederate forces arrived on the scene and instead of attacking, offered assistance. While PRONY was not rescued, the crew were taken onboard CSS CURLEW and brought to New Bern.
Source:
Record #:
34744
Author(s):
Abstract:
In February 1862, two Beaufort residents successfully ran the Union blockade of Beaufort on board the CSS NASHVILLE. Used for transporting goods, NASHVILLE would continue to serve as a blockade runner for Confederate forces. In March, NASHVILLE transported arms and munitions across the blockade at the Cape Fear River; sailed into Nassau, and successfully bypassed Union sailors at the port of Georgetown, South Carolina.
Source:
The Researcher (NoCar F 262 C23 R47), Vol. 22 Issue 1, Spring/Summer 2006, p5-6, il