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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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28 results for Tobacco
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Record #:
353
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Taxing cigarettes is a sensitive issue in North Carolina. Until 1969, NC was the only state that didn't use a cigarette tax as a source of revenue. The state now wrestles with this issue as revenue becomes more and more scarce while expenditures increase.
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NC Insight (NoCar JK 4101 .N3x), Vol. 5 Issue 3, Nov 1982, p12-21, il
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Record #:
380
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North Carolina Commissioner of Agriculture, James A. Graham, offers his views on the tobacco industry in North Carolina.
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NC Insight (NoCar JK 4101 .N3x), Vol. 4 Issue 2, June 1981, p41-44, por
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Record #:
381
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Scientists are able to remove protein from the tobacco leaf in a process known as homogenized leaf curing.
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NC Insight (NoCar JK 4101 .N3x), Vol. 4 Issue 2, June 1981, p28-32, il
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Record #:
382
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North Carolina politicians, including the ubiquitous Jesse Helms, fight for tobacco in North Carolina.
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NC Insight (NoCar JK 4101 .N3x), Vol. 4 Issue 2, June 1981, p33-38
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Record #:
2461
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In 1959, tobacco made up 47 percent of the state's farm receipts, but by 1993, it had fallen to 19 percent. A drop in domestic smoking and stiff foreign competition were contributing factors.
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Record #:
3107
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Small family farmers in the state find their prime money crop, tobacco, declining in price and marketability. To make ends meet requires finding alternate crops, like cotton or organic fruits and vegetables.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 14 Issue 16, Apr 1996, p13-15,17, il Periodical Website
Record #:
8551
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Born in Surry County July 27, 1812, Thomas L. Clingman attended law school at UNC-Chapel Hill and served as a general in the Confederate Army. After being thrown from a horse and later shot in the leg, Clingman applied wet tobacco leaves to his injuries and discovered that this treatment lessened both the pain and swelling within a day. Clingman published a pamphlet in1885 titled “The Tobacco Remedies – The Greatest Medical Discovery.” Prominent Tar Heels including several doctors provided testimonials as to the efficacy and various cures that tobacco offered. Clingman later sold a tobacco leaf cake which could be taken apart and made into a poultice or ointment. Tobacco's healing properties were never definitive or fully accepted when Clingman died in 1897.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 50 Issue 2, July 1982, p9-10, il, por
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Record #:
10098
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Thomas discusses the history of Wilson's Tobacco Festival, which was suspended during the war years, beginning in 1942. Between 75,000 to 100,000 people attended from all parts of the country. Planners hope to resume the festival in 1947.
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Record #:
10376
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In 1771, Johann Matthew Miksch opened a tobacco shop in the Moravian village of Salem along with a log-cabin tobacco manufactory. Both buildings have now been restored and authentically furnished as part of the Old Salem Restoration project. To date, eight village buildings have been restored to their original appearance.
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Record #:
13265
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For most of the 20th-century, farmers in North Carolina have depended on tobacco for a large part of their income. Tobacco holds a dominant position in the state's agricultural market, with the plant grown in 91 of the state's one 100 counties. Parker discusses challenges facing tobacco growers, including foreign imports, concerns over smoking and health, and the government's longstanding allocation system.
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Record #:
13353
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In an excerpt from his 1848 book, Letters from the Alleghanies, Lanman discusses his view on the discovery and use of tobacco by Cherokee Native Americans. Lanman claims that Cherokees began using Tsolungh, the Cherokee word for tobacco, after encountering a man from Asia smoking the plant from a pipe.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 22 Issue 21, Mar 1955, p15-16, il
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Record #:
16349
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Most of what the average American knows about tobacco comes either from cigarette company advertising or from the Federal Government. But among the small, rural tobacco farmers in North Carolina, and among other North Carolina folk in general, there is tobacco lore which has persisted since settlers were introduced to the herb by the Native Americans. The most obvious example is in the area of herbal remedies--tobacco medicine. This article presents a brief summary of the history of tobacco as an herbal medicine, the contemporary uses of tobacco as a folk cure, and comments on the nature of current tobacco medicine in eastern North Carolina.
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Record #:
16402
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The nomenclature of tobacco has been exceptionally diverse. Remarks from 19th- and 20th-century authors support this claim and Tanner provides a listing of the various terms used in writing about tobacco.
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Record #:
16434
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Burley tobacco has long been the chief cash crop grown in the southern Appalachian mountains. Throughout the area one finds a continuity of words and ways involved in burley tobacco production, but there is also colorful variety in local practices and terms.
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Record #:
21790
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Tobacco farming became an ever increasingly important economic enterprise in the late 19th century after the collapse of the cotton industry. The towns of Wilson, Greenville, Rocky Mount, and Kinston adapted with the changing economic and agricultural climate and built auction houses, warehouses, and communities out of migrant workers to accommodate the ever growing tobacco industry.
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