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930 results for North Carolina Folklore Journal
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Record #:
1157
Author(s):
Abstract:
Peck traces the oral narrative along its evolution to what she terms \"local character anecdotes.\" She gathers examples from Carteret County and uses them to support her thesis.
Record #:
1156
Author(s):
Abstract:
A series of articles offers tributes to the recipients of the North Carolina Folklore Society's Brown-Hudson Folklore Awards for 1992. Recipients include Otho Willard, George Higgs, Dorothy Spruill Redford, and Karen Baldwin.
Record #:
1166
Author(s):
Abstract:
The J&E Toy Run in Greenville is a ten-years-running charity event that brings out bikers of all types (mostly Harley-Davidson owners) who deliver toys to the needy and other items to the Salvation Army.
Record #:
1163
Author(s):
Abstract:
Bea Hensley, a blacksmith in Spruce Pine, successfully made the transition from utilitarian to decorative ironwork in the first half of the 20th-century.
Record #:
1606
Author(s):
Abstract:
Dan Tucker is a folk character brought to life by 19th-century minstrels. Greensboro native Calvin Henderson Wiley revived Dan Tucker in his novel, \"Roanoke,\" set on the North Carolina coast.
Record #:
1655
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Ebonettes, an African-American women's service club in Tarboro, collaborated with the author to present the Tarboro African American quilt exhibit that combined folk elements with community development.
Record #:
1656
Author(s):
Abstract:
Mattye Reed, founder, curator, and director of N.C. A & T State University's Mattye Reed African Heritage Center, was honored by the North Carolina Folklore Society with its Brown-Hudson Folklore Award.
Record #:
1658
Author(s):
Abstract:
Thomasville resident George SerVance, one of North Carolina's most accomplished woodcarvers, and his wife Donnis, who paints George's carved dolls, were honored with the North Carolina Folklore Society's Brown-Hudson Folklore Award.
Record #:
1657
Author(s):
Abstract:
Phramaha Somsak Sambimb, a Thai monk who guides Greensboro's Buddhist temple for Southeast Asian refugees, has been honored by the North Carolina Folklore Society with its Brown-Hudson Folklore Award.
Record #:
1660
Author(s):
Abstract:
Mebane native Odell Thompson, North Carolina's last active black banjoist, was killed on April 28, 1994, when he was struck by a car. He had performed earlier that day at the Merle Watson Memorial Festival.
Record #:
1659
Abstract:
Warren County native Claude Richardson, member of the Haliwa-Saponi tribe, has won recognition as a folk artist who carves local soapstone.
Record #:
1693
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Guilford Native American Association, an organization that has strengthened the sense of cultural identity and opportunity among native peoples in the Piedmont, was given the Community Traditions Award by the North Carolina Folklore Society.
Record #:
1692
Author(s):
Abstract:
David E. Whisnant, writer, scholar and contributor to the NC Arts Council, was given the Brown-Hudson Folklore Award by the NC Folklore Society for disabusing folklorists and laypeople of the romantic notion of folk culture.
Subject(s):
Record #:
1734
Author(s):
Abstract:
In the 20th-century North Carolina saw a meeting of agriculture and industry, which gave rise to a hybrid occupation called farmer/peddler. Industry created ways for farmers to peddle their products, thereby raising the farmers' standards of living.