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6 results for Sand dunes
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Record #:
8578
Author(s):
Abstract:
In Brunswick County, people recycle their Christmas trees by placing them on the beach and allowing the ocean to repair the dunes. The trees catch and hold the sand which the ocean pushes over them and, as they disintegrate over the course of the first year, plants root in the newly formed dunes. Old dunes can be ruined by such things as dune buggies or storms, and the Christmas trees help to reform the dunes each year.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 50 Issue 7, Dec 1982, p21-22, il
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Record #:
24044
Author(s):
Abstract:
The natural erosion of the Outer Banks concerned citizens and the U.S. government in the 1920s and 1930s. During the Great Depression, the government created the Federal Emergency Relief Administration, which employed 15,000 Works Progress Administration and Civilian Conservation Corps workers. These young men built vegetated sand dunes to protect the beaches and the livelihood of Outer Banks residents.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 83 Issue 4, September 2015, p41-42, 44, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
1600
Author(s):
Abstract:
The dunes that fringe North Carolina beaches are anchored by a group of remarkably adapted plants. Without these plants the dunes would be susceptible to shifting as dictated by the wind.
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Record #:
31225
Author(s):
Abstract:
North Carolina’s beaches and sand dunes are vulnerable to erosion, and therefore depend on sea oats and beach grass for stabilization. David Nash, a doctoral candidate at North Carolina State University, is growing sea oats that may not only help stabilize sand dunes, but also offer farmers an alternative crop. Nash applied tobacco germination techniques to develop a float system for cultivating local sea oat seeds.
Source:
Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 33 Issue 6, June 2001, p16-17, por Periodical Website
Record #:
35877
Author(s):
Abstract:
The town boasting of lagoons and wildlife, sand dunes and woods, had existed less than forty years. No less important than one existing a little less than four hundred years (Roanoke) was town incorporated the year prior, though. The author proved its lack of gaudiness, found in other resort towns, offered Southern Shores equitable allure to vacationers and NC residents alike.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 8 Issue 6, Aug 1980, p38-39
Record #:
35917
Author(s):
Abstract:
The author suggested Italian explorer Amerigo Vespucci could not have imagined what would become of the sparse strip of land standing between the Atlantic Ocean and Coastal mainland. How much has become of the Outer Banks was in its attraction power to residents and visitors, activities like sand surfing and sailing, hand gliding and sunbathing.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 9 Issue 3, Mar 1981, p50-55