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19 results for Dare County--History
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Record #:
1023
Author(s):
Abstract:
Dare County was once widely known for its pure and potent batches of moonshine. This area was especially popular during the days of Prohibition.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 60 Issue 11, Apr 1993, p10-11, il
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Record #:
4562
Author(s):
Abstract:
Today the Outer Banks are a tourist magnet. However, in the early 1920s, tourists weren't interested because the area lacked bridges, good roads, places to eat and sleep, and interesting activities. What the Outer Banks did have were visionaries like Washington Baum and Frank Stick, who pushed for these things, and Aycock Brown, first director of the Dare County Tourist Bureau, who put the Outer Banks on the map with his endless publicity.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 67 Issue 12, May 2000, p74-79, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
13275
Author(s):
Abstract:
Sharpe examines the history, geography, economic conditions, industries, and general society of Dare County.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 21 Issue 7, July 1953, p9, 11-15, map, f
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Record #:
18285
Author(s):
Abstract:
Continuing his travels around the state, Goerch describes the things of interest he found in Dare County. \"It is,\" he writes, \"a place that is first in settlements, in wireless, in flight, in history, and in many other things, but it remains a section of the state that is still comparatively unknown to many North Carolinians.\"
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 9 Issue 10, Aug 1941, p1-4, 20-22, il, por
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Record #:
24044
Author(s):
Abstract:
The natural erosion of the Outer Banks concerned citizens and the U.S. government in the 1920s and 1930s. During the Great Depression, the government created the Federal Emergency Relief Administration, which employed 15,000 Works Progress Administration and Civilian Conservation Corps workers. These young men built vegetated sand dunes to protect the beaches and the livelihood of Outer Banks residents.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 83 Issue 4, September 2015, p41-42, 44, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
35560
Author(s):
Abstract:
As the director of Dare County Tourist Bureau, Aycock Brown proved to be a memorable figure in ways that went beyond his Panama hat and ever present cameras. The best way, though, was a question from strangers directed to denizens: “do you know Aycock Brown”?
Source:
New East (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 1 Issue 2, Mar/Apr 1973, p30
Record #:
35756
Abstract:
The author provided a Dare County guide with information about the county celebrating its quadricentennial. Cited were the Lost Colony’s history and historic landmarks like Kittyhawk. Described were must see sites like Cape Hatteras, must do recreation like hang gliding off of Jockey’s Ridge; and must visit towns like Southern Shores. As pictorial accompaniment was a hand drawn map of Manteo depicting its historical homes like the Meekins house, businesses like The Old Bank Building, and event sites like the Battle of Burnside.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 7 Issue 4, July/Aug 1979, p30A-30T
Record #:
35779
Author(s):
Abstract:
Described were monuments to a momentous occasion in Kill Devil Hills’ history. One was the statue erected in 1927. Another, founded by a group of North Carolinians that year, was the Kill Devil Hills Memorial Association. A third was a museum that allowed visitors to experience vicariously the brothers’ first flights. As for another more recent endeavor, that was the First Flight Society started by NC natives such as Dare County’s Aycock Brown.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 7 Issue 7, Nov/Dec 1979, p3S
Record #:
35780
Author(s):
Abstract:
Places in Dare County like Colington Island and the village of Duck offered haven for many creatures of the two legged variety. A book cited by Murray, John Lawson’s A New Voyage to Carolina (1709), also made mention of the Merlins and Swaddle-bills who inspired the first flight made almost two centuries later.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 7 Issue 7, Nov/Dec 1979, p4S-6S
Record #:
37217
Author(s):
Abstract:
Article by David Stick about the Revolution in the northeastern region of North Carolina.
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Record #:
35873
Author(s):
Abstract:
What lends the Outer Banks mystique, may obviously lie in towns not widely known such as Duck. A source of mystique not so well known was one Tar Heel natives like Nell Wise Wechter debate: the name's origins. Seeking places to sup while touring the town touting mystique included Wanchese’s Fishermen’s Wharf, Nag Head’s Dareolina, and Kill Devil Hill’s Top of the Dunes.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 8 Issue 6, Aug 1980, p25-27
Record #:
35878
Author(s):
Abstract:
Roanoke was getting ready for its quadricentennial celebration. Part of the preparation: building a replica of the ship that brought the colonists ashore and Lost Colony Center near Waterside Theatre. As for the celebration, flora and fauna paintings of disappeared colonist John White was being remembered as much as the disappearance itself.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 8 Issue 6, Aug 1980, p40-41
Record #:
35874
Abstract:
Peace and freedom: states of being Vic Gillispie, resident of a land eighty percent surrounded by water, also endeavored. What was exceptional about this Dare County painter’s endeavor: his refusal to paint the ocean. Instead of representing the nautical environment on a canvas, he preferred to paint nautical-related objects like decoys.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 8 Issue 6, Aug 1980, p28-29
Record #:
35876
Author(s):
Abstract:
The village was lost in a sense, due to the mysterious disappearance of the original inhabitants. What was not lost, represented in dramas such as The Lost Colony. Profiled during its fortieth anniversary, its latest production proved Roanoke and the lost colonists still possessed mystique.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 8 Issue 6, Aug 1980, p36-37
Record #:
35944
Author(s):
Abstract:
This interview revealed what Hatteras Island was like when it was what Luther Hooper Sr. called a hunter’s paradise. For him, what made Hatteras Island paradisiacal for hunters were the abundance of hunting lodges and parties, adventures in reef hunting and skiff sailing.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 1 Issue 3, Spring 1974, p57-59