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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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6 results for Bird refuges
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Record #:
23309
Author(s):
Abstract:
Sylvan Heights Bird Park houses exotic birds in Scotland Neck and has 3,000 birds in its Avian Breeding Center.
Source:
Record #:
32055
Author(s):
Abstract:
Pea Island National Wildlife Refuge is a popular birdwatching site located in the Outer Banks of North Carolina. The refuge was primarily established for the Greater Snow Goose, but thousands of other bird species and waterfowl inhabit the refuge.
Source:
Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 3 Issue 6, June 1971, p20-21, il
Record #:
35780
Author(s):
Abstract:
Places in Dare County like Colington Island and the village of Duck offered haven for many creatures of the two legged variety. A book cited by Murray, John Lawson’s A New Voyage to Carolina (1709), also made mention of the Merlins and Swaddle-bills who inspired the first flight made almost two centuries later.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 7 Issue 7, Nov/Dec 1979, p4S-6S
Record #:
37016
Abstract:
One woodsman proves that some tools are still standard, despite the ubiquity of digital based technology. His promotion of horse power is extended to teaching students from Appalachian State how to use this tool. Tasks mentioned by the author where horse power is useful included cleaning debris from a graveyard or clearing a mountainside for a bird habitat.
Record #:
35897
Author(s):
Abstract:
Reports of Canadian Goose retreating the Great North Way for Deep South go back at least a few centuries. It began with John Lawson’s accounts written during the early 1700s. With his as a touchstone, publications persisted through the early twentieth century. More recent sightings have been confined to the Carolinas, with locally bred varieties the last of this bird species.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 8 Issue 7, Sept 1980, p68, 65
Record #:
36023
Abstract:
Among the feathered residents in the Island’s refuge were Canada Geese. In addition to the practice of branding, ways to keep an avian population intact included suitable breeding ground and sustainable food supply.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 2 Issue 1, Fall/Winter 1982, p23-25