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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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18 results for Horses
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Record #:
9746
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According to legend, Prince, Greensboro's Eagle Hose Company's fire department's firewagon horse, liked to drink whiskey. Prescribed for him by a veterinarian in 1896, Prince developed a habit of expecting whiskey upon returning from fires. It did not interfere with his jod responsibilities, and he was a very intelligent and faithful friend. He retired in 1908, and died in 1911. A large coffin was built by a Greensboro carpenter, and his firemen friends buried him at a farm outside the city.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 43 Issue 2, July 1975, p18, il
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Record #:
10750
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Jackson describes three bed and breakfast inns that cater to people who travel around North Carolina on horseback. They are the Parkside Bed and Barn (Denton); The Guest House at Burnside Plantation (Henderson); and Turkey Creek Cabins and Horse Camp.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 76 Issue 9, Feb 2009, p126-128;130-133, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
17067
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It's foaling season on Shackleford Banks, a sandy natural haven in the Cape Lookout National Seashore, located a few miles out from Beaufort. The first foal of spring brought the total number of Shackleford horses to 123. According to scientists who study the horses regularly, there are 22 harems and five bachelor bands. This hardy breed is believed to be descendants of Spanish stock brought over by early explorers and later abandoned.
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Record #:
22732
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Sandhill native, Susan Beebee of Vass, is a top competitor in the equestrian sport of eventing.
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Record #:
23304
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A Merry Hill teen is a world champion of competitive horse-riding in the English style.
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Record #:
24009
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Heart of Horse Sense is a nonprofit organization in Madison County that offers equine assisted psychotherapy and learning.
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Record #:
24117
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Carolina Horse and Carriage in Hendersonville opened in 2009 and offers carriage rides to locals and tourist alike. The author discusses her experience on a carriage ride and discusses the history of horse-drawn carriages in the area.
Record #:
27982
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The Triangle chaper of the US Equine Rescue League’s Zebulon rescue center is saving horses. The number of people surrendering their horses has increased lately due to the poor economy and the cost of caring for one. There are many cases involving the surrendering or abuse of horses and the farm works hard to give them a proper home or prepare them for adoption.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 27 Issue 31, July 2010, p14-15 Periodical Website
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Record #:
28678
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Carolyn Mason was instrumental in protecting the wild Shackleford Banks horses. Mason helped lead and organize a campaign to protect the free range horses in 1995. The details of her campaign and its effect on the local horse population are detailed.
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Record #:
29966
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Thought to be the oldest ponies in North America, the horses on the Outer Banks may have come from Spanish settlers and English traders. There are three major herds left to see on Shackleford Banks, Currituck, and Hatteras.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 2 Issue 1, 1982, p8-10, por
Record #:
30800
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Abstract:
Spring brings peak activity to North Carolina's big mid-south golf and riding resorts. Horse training centers for training and conditioning of horses for race or show is another multi-million dollar industry in the North Carolina's tourism appeal. Steeplechase races, harness horse races, hunter trials, and horse shows provide visitors a glimpse of the full racing and show circuits.
Source:
We the People of North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 16 Issue 2, June 1958, p34-35, 39, por
Record #:
31298
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Abstract:
The Southern States Percheron Hitch is an award-winning team of six huge horses driven by two coachmen and pulling an unusual wagon loaded with bags of feed. The horses are based at the Person County farm of Tommy and Ann Lawrence. The Percheron Hitch is a popular attraction at the North Carolina State Fair and parades.
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Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 21 Issue 3, Mar 1989, p10-11, por
Record #:
31541
Author(s):
Abstract:
Jim Phillips runs a general store on Wolf Mountain in Jackson County, and lives alone on a farm forty-five miles from Waynesville. Phillips adopted two horses through the federal “Adopt-a-Horse” program, which allows wild horses to be transplanted from their native Western habitat to new homes throughout the country. This article discusses the horse adoption program and Phillips’ new horse companions.
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Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 12 Issue 11, Nov 1980, p22, il, por
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Record #:
37016
Abstract:
One woodsman proves that some tools are still standard, despite the ubiquity of digital based technology. His promotion of horse power is extended to teaching students from Appalachian State how to use this tool. Tasks mentioned by the author where horse power is useful included cleaning debris from a graveyard or clearing a mountainside for a bird habitat.
Record #:
35961
Abstract:
Vats that kept horses and cattle clean and tick free were first provided during the Great Depression. Stories that attested to the importance of the vats came from Buxton natives attesting to vats in towns like Waves, Avon, and Rodanthe. Buxton. Included were descriptions of the vats and pictures of vats in Avon.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 2 Issue 3, Spring/Summer 1975, p53-57