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51 results for Outer Banks
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Record #:
485
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For innovative planning efforts regarding hurricanes and storm mitigation, the town of Nags Head won several awards from the state government.
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Carolina Planning (NoCar HT 393 N8 C29x), Vol. 16 Issue 2, Fall 1990, p15-18, il, map
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Record #:
1129
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Currituck County's barrier islands are being overdeveloped despite warnings of potential property loss as the islands recede; yet homeowners are sheltered from loss as the U.S. Government has insured the property at the taxpayers' expense.
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Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 11 Issue 23, June 1993, p6-7, por Periodical Website
Record #:
11445
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The Federal Government has created twenty-three national parks. All, except one, lie in the western part of the United States. Stick presents arguments for designating the Outer Banks area of North Carolina a national park.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 1 Issue 25, Nov 1933, p18, 22
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Record #:
15190
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During the late 1930s work was undertaken to stop the erosion of the Outer Banks. Some feared that complete loss of the Outer Banks would inundate mainland North Carolina which prompted Congress to approve the North Carolina beach Erosion Control Project. WPA and CCC boys completed the work which entailed erecting sand fences and planting grasses to prevent beach erosion.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 6 Issue 23, Nov 1938, p9-10, 22
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Record #:
15544
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Post-Hurricane Irene coverage failed to report the aftermath felt by residents on northern Hatteras Island. On September 10, the area opened up to nonresident homeowners for the first time since the storm hit. Along N.C. 12 debris from ruined homes lined the road with estimates as high as 100 homes lost.
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Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 28 Issue 38, Sept 2011, p5, 7, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
22666
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This article details the best beaches near Charlotte. Featured beaches include Tybee Island, Georgia; Hilton Head Island, South Carolina, and North Carolina's Outer Banks.
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Record #:
24044
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The natural erosion of the Outer Banks concerned citizens and the U.S. government in the 1920s and 1930s. During the Great Depression, the government created the Federal Emergency Relief Administration, which employed 15,000 Works Progress Administration and Civilian Conservation Corps workers. These young men built vegetated sand dunes to protect the beaches and the livelihood of Outer Banks residents.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 83 Issue 4, September 2015, p41-42, 44, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
24233
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A six-day celebration in the Outer Banks in December 2003 commemorated the Wright brother's first in flight event. The event marked the end of yearlong extravaganza and the opening of a new visitor center. However, the economic impact of the festivities was less than hoped.
Record #:
24438
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Bird watching is making a comeback on the shores of the Outer Banks. About 400 varieties of birds have been documented on the Outer Banks, and the Audubon Society’s Pine Island Wildlife Sanctuary is home to many of them.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 60 Issue 12, May 1993, p24-26, il
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Record #:
24640
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The Outer Banks is a vast embankment of sand just off shore from North Carolina that has protected the mainland from the ravages of sea but has also caused difficulty concerning navigation. Engineers and sailors alike have considered various ways of stabilizing the banks, opening inlets, and controlling flooding. This article presents some of them.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 26 Issue 19, February 1959, p14-15, 23, il
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Record #:
25054
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Being a lifeguard at the Outer Banks is not as glamorous as Baywatch might make it appear to be. In fact the lifeguards, along with the Coast Guard, engage in rigorous training sessions on a regular basis.
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Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue , Spring 2003, p12-15, il, por Periodical Website
Record #:
25993
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The North Carolina Wildlife Federation, in cooperation with the National Wildlife Federation and the North Carolina Extension’s Forestry Service, are presenting a summit in Manteo, NC designed to give families a learning experience in Outer Banks history and environment.
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Friend O’ Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 19 Issue 4, Sept-Oct 1975, p22
Record #:
12968
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Barrier islands must constantly rebuild themselves, else they will soon disappear. Islands migrate to the west, and winds and ocean overwash are critical factors in this movement. Lloyd discusses how construction on the Outer Banks inhibits these two factors and how this will affect the islands' survival.
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Record #:
31269
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As the Outer Banks has become barren over time, losing its vegetation, the dunes have come alive and processes of movement have sped up due to storms along the coast. With the Outer Banks protecting more than 1.5 million acres of agriculture and forestry, there is argument for replanting of vegetation on the Outer Banks to provide critical stabilization.
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