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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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424 results for Charlotte Magazine
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Record #:
19486
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Jim Rogers spent 25 years  building a reputation as a forward thinking, civic minded coal baron, but with Duke's merger with Progress Energy, Rogers is retiring at the height of his career.
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19488
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Denise Watts is heading an ambitious and risky public education experiment in Charlotte's west side. Watts is pushing for year-round schooling as the first major test for the program she leads, Project LIFT.
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19487
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There is a growing gulf between the political centers of North Carolina--Charlotte and Raleigh. And it will not get any better anytime soon as the state goes bluer but the government turns a deeper shade of red.
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Charlotte Magazine (NoCar F 264.C4), Vol. 18 Issue 5, May 2013, p41-42, 44, 46, 48, 50, 52, 54, 56 Periodical Website
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Record #:
19497
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Ayisha McMillan was a drive, pioneering, and accomplished African-American ballerina with North Carolina Dance Theatre; however, an injury put her in the wings permanently. But she has become part of the Theatre's core as the principal of the newly reorganized dance school.
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Record #:
19502
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June Blotnick is executive director of Clean Air Carolina, an organization that aims to improve air quality across the Charlotte region. She is trying to ease pollution in the neighborhoods most threatened by smog produced by industry and transportation.
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Record #:
19503
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A deeper dig into Charlotte reveals a surprising hidden history, from textile mills and James Brown records, to sit-ins against discriminatory practices and German prisoners of war in Myers Park.
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Record #:
19500
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Five years ago, the underdogs from Davidson College made national headlines when they toppled top seed by top seed in the NCAA basketball tournament. Kruse discusses where they are now.
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Record #:
19501
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Full of new restaurants and bars, NoDa (North Davidson, Charlotte) enters a new phase, transforming from mill village, to crime-ridden, to avant-garde arts district, to something completely new.
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19504
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Charlotte is in an identity crisis--what is the Queen City known for? Recently, local craft beer has become the toast of the town, prompting the potential for the Queen City to become the Craft Beer City.
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Record #:
20404
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In the 1990s, the nonprofit Charlotte Trolley began offering rides in the South End on refurbished, vintage trolley cars in order to attract tourists and prompt economic development.
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Record #:
20403
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After a nine year struggle to build goodwill, the Charlotte Bobcats will be returned to the Charlotte Hornets, beginning with the 2014 season.
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Record #:
20413
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Although Mecklenburg County's Latino population has nearly doubled since 2000, Central and South American culture is still under-represented in local arts. The Lain American Contemporary Art Project is hoping to provide the backdrop for these groups and build awareness and understanding of the diverse community.
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Record #:
20407
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At the Men's Shelter on North Tryon in Charlotte, the Relapse Prevention Program at Jail Central, the Detox Center on Billingsley Road and the Salvation Army's Rehab Program, Laura McCarthy helps those battling addiction through yoga.
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Record #:
20408
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Under the direction of Foundation for the Carolinas, the Charlotte area's preeminent philanthropic organization, large-scale civic issues such as historic preservation are starting to get the attention they deserve.
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Record #:
20410
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Since Charlotte can no longer grow out, city leaders and project developers are pouring millions of dollars into the heart of the city, providing more than just concrete. New projects include stadiums and sports venues, parks, and apartments.
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