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9 results for Barrier islands
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Record #:
15970
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Given the dynamic nature of North Carolina's coastal region, the increasing vulnerability of the coastline to storms and erosion, and the increasing beach population and economy, hazard mitigation practices are becoming more imperative for North Carolina's planners.
Source:
Carolina Planning (NoCar HT 393 N8 C29x), Vol. 25 Issue 2, Summer 2000, p32-35, f
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Record #:
26946
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Barrier islands, such as the Outer Banks of North Carolina, are prone to erosion and natural shifting. Legislation pending in Congress would remove some of the federal subsidies that now encourage developers of barrier islands. This would save taxpayer dollars and low the commercialization of these precious lands.
Source:
Friend O’ Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 29 Issue 9, Sept/Oct 1982, p9, por
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Record #:
12968
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Barrier islands must constantly rebuild themselves, else they will soon disappear. Islands migrate to the west, and winds and ocean overwash are critical factors in this movement. Lloyd discusses how construction on the Outer Banks inhibits these two factors and how this will affect the islands' survival.
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Record #:
12970
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Sorenson explains the process which moves barrier islands from east to west.
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Record #:
26797
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Some of the best hunting and fishing areas on the Atlantic and Gulf Coasts are on and around undeveloped barrier islands. Yet, these areas are experiencing the fastest growth, urbanizing at twice the rate of the mainland. Unless policies are changed, costs to taxpayers for barrier island development and loss of natural habitat will be enormous.
Source:
Friend O’ Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 28 Issue 3, Mar 1981, p10, il
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Record #:
26824
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Abstract:
Barrier islands, such as the Outer Banks of North Carolina, have aesthetic and recreational value, which also make them prime targets for development. A new bill would prohibit the federal government from providing financial assistance for commercial and residential development of barrier beaches.
Source:
Friend O’ Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 28 Issue 7, July 1981, p3
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Record #:
26869
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Abstract:
The National Wildlife Federation and other conservation groups are supporting legislation that will reduce federal subsidies for development of barrier islands. This would save tax dollars and curtail destruction of barrier islands, such as the Outer Banks of North Carolina.
Source:
Friend O’ Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 28 Issue 12, Dec 1981, p10, il
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Record #:
34282
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The state boundaries of North Carolina are more than just lines on a map; they have led to tales of love and murder, pride and confusion, new islands and old disputes. Twenty stories describe how history, geography, race, culture, politics, and geophysical events that have shaped North Carolina, the Outer Banks and newly formed Shelly Island.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 85 Issue 12, May 2018, p90-121, il, por, map Periodical Website
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Record #:
38120
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Abstract:
Pirates found a profitable place in Eastern North Carolina because of shoals creating treacherous sailing conditions and inlets providing multiple traveling routes. Pirates also found a welcoming living environment due to the citizenry’s relatively relaxed attitudes about their lifestyle and authorities condoning activities like smuggling and wrecking. Additional proof the presence of pirates was not confined to Blackbeard were profiles of Stede Bonnet, Calico Jack Rackham, Anne Bonny, Mary Read, Charles Vane, Edward Low, George Lowther, and Richard Worley.