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44 results for Blackbeard, d. 1718
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Record #:
189
Abstract:
Edward Teach, affectionately known as Blackbeard, was a frequent visitor to the coast of North Carolina.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 59 Issue 10, Mar 1992, p16-17, por
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Record #:
3324
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The N.C. Division of Archives and History announced on March 3, 1997, the discovery of what is thought to be the remains of the QUEEN ANNE'S REVENGE, Blackbeard's flagship. The ship sank in June, 1718, two miles off Beaufort Inlet.
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Record #:
3430
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On November 21, 1996, a ship reported to be the QUEEN ANNE'S REVENGE, Blackbeard's flagship, was discovered about three miles off the Beaufort-Morehead City area. If confirmed, the find will provide valuable information on pirate life and ships.
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3429
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Among pirates, Blackbeard's fame towered over all. Dressed all in black, his bushy beard smoking with cannon fuses, and armed with six pistols and a cutlass, he inspired terror in all he met. He was killed near Ocracoke in 1718 by the king's navy.
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Record #:
3428
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Edward Teach, called Blackbeard the pirate, terrorized the state's coastal waters in the early 18th-century, creating a trail of legend and folklore before he was killed in 1718, near Ocracoke, fighting the king's navy.
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Record #:
3702
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Blackbeard the pirate was the terror of the coast during the early 18th-century. He was killed near Ocracoke in 1718. A shipwreck found off Beaufort Inlet on November 21, 1996, is thought to be his flagship QUEEN ANNE'S REVENGE.
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Tributaries (NoCar Ref VK 24 N8 T74), Vol. Issue 7, Oct 1997, p30-39, il, f
Record #:
3917
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By studying the historical geography of Beaufort Inlet, Intersal, Inc. was able to determine inlet boundaries, features, and obstacles in the 18th-century. Using this data, the firm conducted a ten-year search that discovered what is thought to be the wreck of Blackbeard's flagship QUEEN ANNE'S REVENGE.
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Tributaries (NoCar Ref VK 24 N8 T74), Vol. Issue 8, Oct 1998, p24-33, il
Record #:
4104
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A shipwreck found off Beaufort on November 21, 1996, tantalizes researchers with the possibility that it could be Blackbeard's flagship, the QUEEN ANNE'S REVENGE. Many of the more than 350 items brought to the surface are from Blackbeard's era, giving support for the theory, but definitive evidence has yet to be found.
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Record #:
4651
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Resting in twenty-two feet of water about a mile off the coast from Beaufort, the Queen Anne's Revenge, the flagship of the pirate Blackbeard, has lain quietly for almost three centuries. Since its discovery in 1996, the wreck has interested many, including scientists, historians, and under- water archaeologists. For example, John T. Wells, director of the Institute of Marine Sciences, hopes to reconstruct the surrounding environment at the time of the sinking.
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Endeavors (NoCar LD 3941.3 A3), Vol. 16 Issue 1, Fall 1999, p10-12, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
4679
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Blackbeard was the most famous of all the pirates during the Golden Age of Piracy, which lasted from the late 17th-century into the early 18-century. He raided ships and towns from the Caribbean to the coasts of Virginia and the Carolinas, and his personal appearance inspired terror in those he confronted. He was killed near Ocracoke in 1718 by sailors of the King's navy.
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Record #:
10167
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Kevin Duffus, author, researcher, and filmmaker, discusses his latest book, The Last Days of Black Beard the Pirate.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 76 Issue 2, July 2008, p18-21, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
13410
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Stede Bonnet and Edward Thatch teamed up in the piracy business, but the gentlemen pirates soon ran out of luck.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 21 Issue 23, Nov 1953, p4-5, 14, il
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Record #:
13413
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Blackbeard had many names, and there is a mystery about his origins but there is a consensus that he was a bully.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 21 Issue 24, Nov 1953, p1-2, f
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Record #:
13428
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By 1718 Governor Spotswood had become disturbed by the reports of Blackbeard's attempted fortification of Ocracoke Island, North Carolina. The Governor hired two sloops to track him down and Lieutenant Robert Maynard brought Blackbeard to his end.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 21 Issue 27, Dec 1953, p5-6, il
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Record #:
13997
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Outstanding among the Carolina pirates were Edward Teach and Stede Bonnet. They played havoc with shipping off the North Carolina coast until finally captured.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 18 Issue 45, Apr 1951, p6, 17
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