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11 results for Pirates--North Carolina, Eastern
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Record #:
13395
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Abstract:
The story of piracy in North Carolina dates back to 1586 when Francis Drake visited Raleigh's Roanoke Island Colony. North Carolina was the last great stronghold in the age of piracy, and there have been many that have practiced it on the shores of North Carolina.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 21 Issue 20 , Oct 1953, p1-2, 24, il
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Record #:
14311
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Abstract:
Ann Bonney and Mary Read are the subjects of this article about famous female North Carolinians. Each of these women gained their reputations for being pirates in an age when women were rarely onboard ships, let alone active, ruthless individuals. The author provides a brief biographical sketch of each lady and her career on the high seas.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 16 Issue 32, Jan 1949, p3
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Record #:
14927
Author(s):
Abstract:
\"Ecce Homo\" means \"Behold the Man\" and a painting entitled Ecce Homo captured a portrait of Christ and hangs in St. James Episcopal Church in Wilmington. Its arrival in Wilmington involved a classic swashbuckling tale. The portrait was reported to be stolen from a Spanish pirate vessel in 1747 when the pirates attempted an attack on Brunswick along the Cape Fear River but lost and one of their four ships sunk. Colonists retrieved goods, including the portrait, from on of the abandoned vessels for use in Brunswick and Wilmington churches.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 11 Issue 38, Feb 1944, p5, 18, il
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Record #:
17780
Author(s):
Abstract:
John Vidal's career as a pirate was short-lived and comedic. For one week in 1727, Vidal, who called Bath home, attempted to raid Ocracoke Inlet just after the Gold Age of Piracy. His acts of piracy around the inlet were brought to trial on August 15, 1727 in front of Virginia's Acting Royal Governor. Where Vidal was unfortunate in piracy, he was fortunate in the Governor's ruling which initially was execution but Vidal was later pardoned.
Source:
Tributaries (NoCar Ref VK 24 N8 T74), Vol. Issue 12, October 2004, p6-17, il
Record #:
24804
Author(s):
Abstract:
Blackbeard is one of the most famous pirates in history, but much of his past is shrouded in mystery. History student and author, Baylus Brooks argues that contrary to popular belief, Blackbeard was not a ruthless pirate, but rather his actions were much milder than previously thought. He reveals new information about the identity of Blackbeard, his genealogical history, and his motivations for acts of piracy.
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Record #:
17277
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Abstract:
Chased out of the Caribbean and Charles Town, South Carolina, autumn 1718, the dreaded buccaneer Blackbeard and his fleet needed a safe haven. They found one in the friendly Outer Banks of North Carolina. But authorities hunting pirates knew where to find them and other pirates and renegades.
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Record #:
35509
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Abstract:
More than the end of a man’s life happened on November 22, 1718, according to the author. With the death of Edward Teach, better known as Blackbeard, the golden age of piracy in the New World effectively came to an end. Highlighted in this chronicle were people who played an instrumental role, notably Governor Spotswood of Virginia, and the events from June through November that led to the end for this famous pirate.
Source:
New East (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 3 Issue 5, Nov/Dec 1975, p13-15
Record #:
35799
Author(s):
Abstract:
Blackbeard’s infamous reputation, gained from his pirate pursuits on the high seas, had preceded his arrival on land. At a town whose name has become intertwined with his, the shadow lengthened; a man’s name was added to his litany of victims.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 7 Issue 1, Jan/Feb 1979, p37, 39-42, 67
Record #:
35958
Author(s):
Abstract:
Blackbeard’s enduring legend, well known in Beaufort, was anchored in other Eastern North Carolina towns. Connections sunk deeply in New Bern included a house, as well as anchor and manacles reportedly from a ship sunk not far from his house. As for intangible connections, there slave-owning stories possibly validated by the discovered manacles and anchor.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 2 Issue 1, Summer 1974, p39
Record #:
38119
Author(s):
Abstract:
From the mystique built up around Blackbeard the past three centuries, the scant details that can be defined as truth have been coated with generous layers of fiction. Defining his life and death as more a series of questions than statements are speculations such as the location of his treasure and real name. Counted as closer to the truth by historical interpreters and members of the North Carolina Historical Society are Blackbeard’s ties with Bath and Colonial administrative officials. Contributing also to truth’s pursuit are the Blackbeard Jamboree. This festival includes activities such as seafaring and tavern songs and camps that reflect 17th and 18th-century maritime lifeways.
Record #:
38120
Author(s):
Abstract:
Pirates found a profitable place in Eastern North Carolina because of shoals creating treacherous sailing conditions and inlets providing multiple traveling routes. Pirates also found a welcoming living environment due to the citizenry’s relatively relaxed attitudes about their lifestyle and authorities condoning activities like smuggling and wrecking. Additional proof the presence of pirates was not confined to Blackbeard were profiles of Stede Bonnet, Calico Jack Rackham, Anne Bonny, Mary Read, Charles Vane, Edward Low, George Lowther, and Richard Worley.