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Record #:
16749
Abstract:
The skipjack ADA MAE, under restoration in New Bern by a team of volunteers, is one of the few remaining historical vessels on the East Coast. She will be used as an educational vessel for school students, helping them appreciate North Carolina's coastal heritage through hands-on shipboard experience.
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Record #:
35943
Abstract:
The life of Archie Scarborough included a skill for square knot making. Much of the interview pivoted around this talent, what he also called macramé making. Traveling the conversation path included life landmarks such as contenting with the Park Service and helping to construct Wimble Shoals Lighthouse and a railroad in Kitty Hawk.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 1 Issue 3, Spring 1974, p48-53
Record #:
35934
Author(s):
Abstract:
A continuation of the series begun in Sea Chest’s first edition, this collection of journal entries mostly chronicled the meteorological conditions between September 1874-July 1879. Wedged between daily reports of barometric pressure were occasional ones of ships setting sail and their minor damages. Rare reports were of loss of life from shipwrecks and drownings.
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Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 1 Issue 2, Fall 1973, p48-60
Record #:
35954
Author(s):
Abstract:
Remembrance of rescue from a Coast Guard boat overtaken by a hurricane was spurred by the death of Lt. Bernice Ramon Ballance. He, as much as the event, was a reminder that heroes, found during war and peace, can be located on a rescuing sea plane as much as capsized cutter. For more information about this event, refer to the book, North Carolina Hurricanes, by Charles B. Carney and Albert V. Hardy.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 2 Issue 1, Summer 1974, p59-64
Record #:
35958
Author(s):
Abstract:
Blackbeard’s enduring legend, well known in Beaufort, was anchored in other Eastern North Carolina towns. Connections sunk deeply in New Bern included a house, as well as anchor and manacles reportedly from a ship sunk not far from his house. As for intangible connections, there slave-owning stories possibly validated by the discovered manacles and anchor.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 2 Issue 1, Summer 1974, p39
Record #:
36017
Abstract:
She was designed as a Bicentennial project, bearing a brand of authenticity in its fifteen stars and stripes flag. However, this sailing vessel still may have been a point of pride, since clipper ships had played an important role in America the past two centuries, notably during the war of 1812.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 1 Issue 2, Spring/Summer 1981, p35-38
Record #:
36048
Author(s):
Abstract:
Larry Babits’ HIST 6875 students brought history to life from a four-week reenactment of life aboard a brigantine. Before collaboration and studying abroad were higher education buzzwords, they applied both in a reconstructed version of this ship. For them, studying the War of 1812 and Battle of Lake Erie was an all hands on deck experience.