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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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9 results for World War I
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Record #:
35943
Abstract:
The life of Archie Scarborough included a skill for square knot making. Much of the interview pivoted around this talent, what he also called macramé making. Traveling the conversation path included life landmarks such as contenting with the Park Service and helping to construct Wimble Shoals Lighthouse and a railroad in Kitty Hawk.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 1 Issue 3, Spring 1974, p48-53
Record #:
35815
Author(s):
Abstract:
Details betraying the size of the town and number of decades past were in Smith’s short story. There was the town population of six families; wood burning stove; brass bed; coal as a heat source. The most evident, though, was the date mentioned in the life of Viola and her family. Armistice was no ordinary day, but not just because it signaled the end of WWI. It also meant Uncle Milton’s return from France’s front.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 8 Issue 1, Feb 1980, p12-13
Record #:
35932
Abstract:
If asked to identify visionaries for flight, one might consider the Wright Brothers. Someone else with maven status for advocating airplanes, but perhaps not so well known was General Billy Mitchell. Largely unpopular during his time, Mitchell’s assertion of combining aircraft and naval operations gradually gained support through the efforts of the then Secretary of the Navy, Franklin Delano Roosevelt.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 1 Issue 2, Fall 1973, p44-45
Record #:
35933
Abstract:
General Billy Mitchell’s efforts to establish airplanes in naval operations included building an airstrip at Cape Hatteras. The first mission, taking place during the summer of 1923, was proving sinking battleships possible. Ironically, for many people living in the area, it was regarded as much entertainment as witnessing an historic event.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 1 Issue 2, Fall 1973, p46-47
Record #:
35938
Abstract:
Mrs. J.D. Barnett recounted the WWI sinking of the Diamond Shoals lightship by German submarines, an event reported in the local newspaper. As for the source of the entire story, that her father in law, captain of the sunken lightship.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 1 Issue 3, Spring 1974, p21-23
Record #:
35957
Author(s):
Abstract:
Remnants of a famous—and infamous—pirate’s legend were in a familial connection (one of Blackbeard’s wives, a native); his naming of Ocracoke; his death, when he reportedly sailed around the ship seven times after his beheading. Other remnants of the importance of ships were shipwrecks, such as the Carroll A. Derring. As for the origins for other town names, noted were Kill Devil Hills and Chicamacomico, both inspired by the original inhabitants.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 2 Issue 1, Summer 1974, p34-38
Record #:
36076
Author(s):
Abstract:
Among East Carolina Teacher’s Training School’s collection of historically famous facts was the source of the first spring break. Despite modern technology’s absence, the first president’s promise to have the college re-opened in ten days was kept. For this article, the promise kept was also illustrated in pictures. Accompanied photos chronicled the rebuilding of the current Old Cafeteria Building and former Refectory between April 2nd-12th, 1915.
Record #:
36143
Author(s):
Abstract:
The man with a lifelong enthusiasm for flight inspired the naming of a Marine Air Corps station. What is known today familiarly as Cherry Point began its life as Cunningham Field. The WWI veteran, who also fought for marine aviation's establishment, also had this role honored in his induction into the Aviator Hall of Fame in the 1960s. Other honors were a destroyer and two streets in Havelock named for him, as well as burial in the National Cemetery.
Record #:
38134
Author(s):
Abstract:
This museum in Tarboro, opened in 2004, is more than a way to honor Edgecombe veterans from wars spanning the American Revolution to Middle East conflicts. It offers a way of life across the centuries and all military branches. Its 30,000 plus gems include bayonets, Civil War battle flags, a restored WWII jeep, samurai swords, Nazi helmets, and 1,000 photographs.