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8 results for Kill Devil Hills--Description and travel
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Record #:
12355
Author(s):
Abstract:
Located on North Carolina's Outer Banks, the Dare County town of Kill Devil Hills is featured in Our State magazine's Tar Heel Town of the Month section.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 78 Issue 2, July 2010, p26-28, 30, 32-34, 36-37, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
13252
Author(s):
Abstract:
Ten miles from Siler City in western Chatham County, a strange story draws visitors to a cleared path in a perfect circle of trees on the property of L.R. Down. The story is that the Devil goes there to walk in circles as he thinks up new means of causing trouble for humanity. But there are additional legends relating to the area, including Indian tales of the lost colony of Roanoke.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 21 Issue 6, July 1953, p4-5, 13, il, f
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Record #:
24659
Author(s):
Abstract:
This article serves as a guide for tourists who wish to travel to the Northeast coastal region in North Carolina and focuses on cities such as Kill Devil Hills, the Outer Banks, and the Albemarle Sound.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 25 Issue 2, June 1957, p33-37, il
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Record #:
34902
Author(s):
Abstract:
In 2008, the Outer Banks Brewing Station in Kill Devil Hills became the only restaurant and pub in the world to have a wind turbine on site. Because of the high power prices, the pub embraced the environmentally-friendly power source and hope to embrace solar energy as well.
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Record #:
35779
Author(s):
Abstract:
Described were monuments to a momentous occasion in Kill Devil Hills’ history. One was the statue erected in 1927. Another, founded by a group of North Carolinians that year, was the Kill Devil Hills Memorial Association. A third was a museum that allowed visitors to experience vicariously the brothers’ first flights. As for another more recent endeavor, that was the First Flight Society started by NC natives such as Dare County’s Aycock Brown.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 7 Issue 7, Nov/Dec 1979, p3S
Record #:
35873
Author(s):
Abstract:
What lends the Outer Banks mystique, may obviously lie in towns not widely known such as Duck. A source of mystique not so well known was one Tar Heel natives like Nell Wise Wechter debate: the name's origins. Seeking places to sup while touring the town touting mystique included Wanchese’s Fishermen’s Wharf, Nag Head’s Dareolina, and Kill Devil Hill’s Top of the Dunes.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 8 Issue 6, Aug 1980, p25-27
Record #:
35957
Author(s):
Abstract:
Remnants of a famous—and infamous—pirate’s legend were in a familial connection (one of Blackbeard’s wives, a native); his naming of Ocracoke; his death, when he reportedly sailed around the ship seven times after his beheading. Other remnants of the importance of ships were shipwrecks, such as the Carroll A. Derring. As for the origins for other town names, noted were Kill Devil Hills and Chicamacomico, both inspired by the original inhabitants.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 2 Issue 1, Summer 1974, p34-38
Record #:
36014
Author(s):
Abstract:
Of personal interest to the author were also items of historical interest. Up close and personal was the view that he offered of sunken ships, as well as the marine life that lived around them. As visual illustration was a map locating the wrecked watercrafts, which included a German submarine. Accompanying the map was a brief description of each: an old boiler, LST#741, Richmond, Kyzickes, Zane Gray, U-85, and York.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 1 Issue 1, Spring/Summer 1980, p10-13, map