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50 results for Mims, Bryan
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Record #:
21003
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Abstract:
What happens to K9s after their time of military service is completed? Those who make it back often return, like their soldier counterparts, with PSTD, while others return with no problems. If the dog is fortunate, his handler, the person who knows him best, will adopt him. Otherwise, the animal is put up for adoption. Mims recounts the story of Doc, who was an IED sniffing dog who served in Iraq and Afghanistan, and is now living in retirement.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 81 Issue 6, Nov 2013, p164-166, 168, 170, 172-176, 178, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
22097
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Menhaden are not prized as game fish or food, but for industrial purposes. This fish, growing up to fifteen inches, was at the bottom of the food chain, but in Carteret County, it was the fish that built Beaufort. Menhaden processing began after the Civil War, and in the twentieth century about a dozen companies operated in the county providing employment for generations. The last factory closed in 2005. The industry is now gone, but what remains are the songs--chanteys--created by the workers--chanteymen--as they pulled in the catch.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 81 Issue 12, May 2014, p44-46, 48, 50, 52-54, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
22138
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Road building held a low priority in North Carolina until the beginning of the 20th-century. At that time the state was not involved. It was left to the counties, and the counties did not work together. Therefore, crossing county lines would often provide a different type of road for drivers. The implementation of Rural Free Delivery (RFD), the North Carolina Good Roads Association, and the affordable Model T Ford made road construction a necessity. During the 1920s, through the efforts of Governors Locke Craig and Cameron Morrison and State Highway Commission Chairman, Frank Page, the state became nationally known for its outstanding highway system.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 82 Issue 2, Jul 2014, p42-44, 46, 48-49, il, map Periodical Website
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Record #:
22731
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A Fayetteville couple credits the Uniformed Services Organization (USO) with bringing them together 65 years ago.
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Record #:
22740
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Cumberland County has many special places to offer the visitor and the native. Among them is the small community of Stedman.
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Record #:
22754
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Many fall festivals that can be found across North Carolina.
Record #:
22788
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The Chatham Manufacturing Company sustained the town of Elkin and provided employment for over one-hundred years. The company opened in 1877 and produced textiles, including blankets, flannel clothing, and knitting yarns, but they are most famous for blanket manufacturing. As a successful business, Chatham cared for its community providing jobs and building vital institutions such as a hospital and a YMCA.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 82 Issue 8, January 2015, p35-38, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
23886
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The country's largest ammunition port is located in Brunswick County, North Carolina. Military Ocean Terminal Sunny Point (MOTSU) was built between 1952-1955 and is where ships load or unload weapon cargo, including rockets, missiles, howitzers, grenades, projectiles, and pyrotechnics.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 82 Issue 12, May 2015, p45-46, 48, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
23904
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Beaufort and Blowing Rock, two towns on opposite ends of the state, have more in common than one may think. Both represent small-town America and embody the spirit of their respective regions--the coast and the mountains--the areas North Carolinians and out-of-staters flock to.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 83 Issue 1, June 2015, p112-116,118-119, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
23913
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Wing Haven Gardens and Bird Sanctuary in Charlotte's Myers Park neighborhood is a three-acre place of solitude for those hoping to briefly escape their busy metropolitan lives. The home and gardens belonged to Edwin and Elizabeth Clarkson from the 1930s through 1970.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 82 Issue 10, March 2015, p156-158, 160, 162, 164, il, por, map Periodical Website
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Record #:
23928
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El's Drive-In in Morehead City offers window service reminiscent of the 1950s and 1960s. The restaurant, owned and operated by the Elvin Frank family, has been a part of the Morehead City restaurant scene since 1959 and is still going strong.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 83 Issue 2, July 2015, p120-122, 124, il, por, map Periodical Website
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Record #:
24063
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Streetcars were an important part of North Carolina towns during the late-nineteenth and early-twentieth centuries. Originally, mules and horses pulled these cars, but in 1889, Asheville opened the first electric streetcar system in the state. Charlotte and Raleigh followed, and the streetcar allowed such cities to expand and establish suburban neighborhoods. By the 1930s, automobiles and buses replaced the streetcar, but today the system has been revived in the form of Charlotte's CityLYNX Gold Line, which runs three replica trolleys on a 1.5-mile track.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 83 Issue 5, October 2015, p43-44, 46, 48, il Periodical Website
Record #:
24259
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In Depression-era North Carolina, the state was mostly agrarian despite the increase in industrialization. Still, the wealthy took vacations. This new travel culture prompted state officials to develop a tourism trade for North Carolina based on its natural resources, the mountains and the sea.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 83 Issue 3, August 2015, p39-40, 42, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
24605
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In January 1964, the Surgeon General explained the findings of a recent study—that cigarette smoking was linked to lung cancer and heart disease. Since that time, the tobacco industry has received a number of blows, including the end of the quota system in 2004. Some North Carolina tobacco farmers continue to grow tobacco, but many discontinued harvesting the crop and instead turned to farming other products, such as berries and grapes.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 82 Issue 4, September 2014, p166-168, 170, 172, 174, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
24611
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During World War II, David Finley, the first director of the National Gallery of Art in Washington, D.C. needed a sanctuary for the fine art in the gallery. Finley turned to his friend Edith Vanderbilt, who willingly agreed to hide these rare pieces of art at the Biltmore Estate. Painstaking effort ensured that the pieces were hidden and stored in a room with steel vaulted doors and steel barred windows. Some pieces kept at the Biltmore included Gilbert Stuart’s portrait of George Washington, Raphael’s Portrait of Bindo Altoviti, and Titian’s Venus with a Mirror.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 82 Issue 5, October 2014, p40-42, 44, 46-47, il, por Periodical Website
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