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8 results for North Carolina--History--20th century
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Record #:
19641
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Abstract:
A continuation of an article on the same topic printed in July 1930, this work becomes more specific about the Farmers' Union membership and engagement of these men. Founded in 1905, activities of the Farmers' Union became important across the state after 1908 through the end of this organization in 1921. During this period membership surpassed 33,000 with members engaged in political, economic, social, and educational activities.
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Record #:
20616
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After the election of 1896 Republican candidates failed to win a gubernatorial election for fifty years. Despite repeated failure, Republicans did gain support in the early 20th century. The author examines both state and national politics to better understand the era's Republican party and its relationship with North Carolinians.
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Record #:
20883
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This is a reprint of a speech delivered to the North Carolina Literary and Historical Association in Raleigh. Dr. Lord sees history as best categorized into \"ages,\" and assigns the tile of \"age of explosions\" to the mid 20th century period of advancement that includes space flight, digital translation, automation, population increases, and the rise of nationalism.
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Record #:
24084
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The author discusses the time period from the close of the Civil War through the first years of the 20th century, specifically focusing on significant events in Asheville during the time period known as the 'Gilded Age.' The author focuses on the McKee family and their time at the historic Smith-McDowell House.
Record #:
24259
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In Depression-era North Carolina, the state was mostly agrarian despite the increase in industrialization. Still, the wealthy took vacations. This new travel culture prompted state officials to develop a tourism trade for North Carolina based on its natural resources, the mountains and the sea.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 83 Issue 3, August 2015, p39-40, 42, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
7074
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Freeze compares life in North Carolina in 1953 to what it is like in 2003. For example, in 1953, most of the population lived in the country or in small towns of less than 1,000 residents. Many areas lacked electrical service. The electronic world of today was just a dream. Nor were there huge malls or stores on the bypasses. The greatest social change has been the end to racial segregation, and politically, the Republicans are now the dominant party. One thing remains constant, however; it's still 543 miles from Manteo to Murphy.
Source:
Tar Heel Junior Historian (NoCar F 251 T3x), Vol. 42 Issue 2, Spring 2003, p4-7, il, map
Record #:
22707
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Abstract:
On a journey from Mobile, Alabama to Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, the schooner HARRY A. BERWIND experienced gunfire on the morning of October 10, 1905. A black sailor was said to have murdered all the white crew and ordered surviving crew to sail to Cape Fear. Although the story is mentioned infrequently it provides important information on life at sea and relationships between races, particularly with federal court handling of cases involving black and foreign nationals, at the dawn of the twentieth century.
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Record #:
22708
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Abstract:
David Clark (1877-1955), an ultra-conservative spokesman for southern textile industrialists, worked to halt child labor legislation in interest of textile mills and the Farmers' States Rights League, which relied heavily on child labor in the early 1900s.