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36 results for Outer Banks--Culture
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Record #:
19496
Author(s):
Abstract:
Hatteras native and author Tom Carlson paints a splendid picture of the people, issues, and ideas of the Outer Banks in his book \"Hatteras Blues: A Story from the Edge of America.\" During the course of the book, Carlson conveys the uniqueness of culture and character found on the Outer Banks.
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Subject(s):
Record #:
25107
Author(s):
Abstract:
Citizens of the villages on the barrier islands of North Carolina have spoken a distinctive English dialect not found outside of the Outer Banks. Dr. Walt Wolfram, a professor at NC State and researcher of North Carolina dialects, describes the Outer Banks brogue and highlights the importance of documenting it for future generations.
Source:
Tar Heel Junior Historian (NoCar F 251 T3x), Vol. 55 Issue 2, Spring 2016, p10-11, il, por, map
Record #:
22473
Author(s):
Abstract:
North Carolina Outer Bank residents produces a unique and local version of each original story. Story tellers take the original tropes and story points from the ancient myths and cast them into a modern and local setting, as well as speak a pure and idiomatic English unique to the region. By doing so, they are able to convey the values from those stories in an easier and more accessible manner.
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Record #:
28843
Author(s):
Abstract:
Bob Podolak, a former cardiologist at the University of North Carolina medical school, and his wife Tina have homes in Buxton, North Carolina and Denver, Colorado. The Podolaks reflect on their experiences living in the Outer Banks and memories of the diverse local culture.
Source:
Metro Magazine (NoCar F 264 R1 M48), Vol. 13 Issue 5, July 2012, p32-35, il, por Periodical Website
Record #:
35873
Author(s):
Abstract:
What lends the Outer Banks mystique, may obviously lie in towns not widely known such as Duck. A source of mystique not so well known was one Tar Heel natives like Nell Wise Wechter debate: the name's origins. Seeking places to sup while touring the town touting mystique included Wanchese’s Fishermen’s Wharf, Nag Head’s Dareolina, and Kill Devil Hill’s Top of the Dunes.
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Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 8 Issue 6, Aug 1980, p25-27
Record #:
35870
Author(s):
Abstract:
A popular vacation spot for people from both sides of the Mason-Dixon Line, the Outer Banks retained a mystique. This quality, Wise claims the other area noted, the Mountains, lacks. He noted it as an irony: the Mountains have retained a claim to the past that granted it legend status.
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Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 8 Issue 6, Aug 1980, p13
Record #:
36004
Author(s):
Abstract:
Old time crabbing meant trot lines instead of wire pots, and income of three cents a pound versus the contemporary rate of twelve. From Edward Scarborough’s observations about facts like these, one ironic conclusion could be drawn. A better living could be made in the midst of the Great Depression than forty years later.
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Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 5 Issue 1, Fall 1978, p18-21
Record #:
35927
Abstract:
It’s been suggested the Outer Banks dialect was a remnant of Elizabethan age colonial residency. Another unique aspect of Banker speech was common words and phrases. Among the possibly known by other Coastal Plain residents: dingbattin’. Others possibly known by people outside of NC include grub. Others like peelin’ the green may be known only to natives.
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Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 1 Issue 1, Spring/Summer 1973, p40-43
Record #:
35929
Author(s):
Abstract:
What TJ Evans shared was evidence of the Banks’ long personal history and occasional weavings into the greater tapestry of American history. His stories highlighting the history of Cape Hatteras Island, its lighthouse, and the Banks’ experiences with hurricanes. As for involvement with historical events of greater reported significance, noted was the only direct contact made with the sinking Titanic, from the Cape Hatteras Wireless Station.
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Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 1 Issue 1, Spring/Summer 1973, p56-58
Record #:
35931
Author(s):
Abstract:
An aspect making a people unique are expressions and descriptions that reveal their perception. This collection represented nautical lifeways that defined cardinal cultural values of the area and served as a memory for values of generations past. Phrases perhaps unique to the Banks included atter-a-while and foine; ones more characteristic of time period included Hessian and sparkin’.
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Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 1 Issue 2, Fall 1973, p41-43
Record #:
35942
Abstract:
The grave of Hezekiah Quidley proved his earthly life was over. Reports about mysterious sounds in the woods suggested his love for fiddle playing lived on. Stories about a woman appearing to her former boyfriend after her death also proved things going bump in the night were sometimes restless spirits.
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Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 1 Issue 3, Spring 1974, p44-47
Record #:
35941
Author(s):
Abstract:
This collection of saying and phrases included those not exclusive to the area, such as frock. As for sayings and phrases perhaps not known outside of the Outer Banks, they included woine.
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Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 1 Issue 3, Spring 1974, p41-43
Record #:
35946
Abstract:
Times had changed, as indicated in the girls’ age range, 18-28, and a marital status for some. A sign of changed times was also evident in chaperones needed if males visited. Timeless values could be seen in purposes for a club with an overnight stay option: rest, reading, and recreation.
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Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 2 Issue 1, Summer 1974, p14-15
Record #:
35951
Author(s):
Abstract:
Some terms part of the Outer Banks dialect, like shore and fatbacks, reflected the area's nautical nature. Other terms, like waist and fresh, more likely reflect the time period’s vernacular than place.
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Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 2 Issue 1, Summer 1974, p56
Record #:
35950
Author(s):
Abstract:
A healing or cure was as possible with these rural remedies, whether for toothache or animal bite, for ear infection or wasp sting.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 2 Issue 1, Summer 1974, p49-50