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25 results for Ghosts
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Record #:
10342
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Ghost walks have become a popular form of tourism for those who like the eerie and supernatural. At one time they were a part of the Halloween season only, but they have become so popular that many communities hold them year-round. Three coastal communities that offer walks are the Beaufort Ghost Walk, Ocracoke Ghost Walk and Historic Tour, and the Ghost Walk of Old Wilmington.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 76 Issue 5, Oct 2008, p132-134, 136, 138, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
10341
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Andreas Kremser, a Moravian who lived in the Single Brothers House in Salem, was killed when an excavation at the house collapsed on him. Duncan recounts sightings of him up till 1950, when a visiting minister determined that he should “lay the ghost.”
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 76 Issue 5, Oct 2008, p126-128, 130,, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
10669
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The Maco Light is one of a number of unexplained and unsolved mysteries that have occurred in North Carolina over the years. Sixty years ago, at Maco, located fifteen miles west of Wilmington, a passenger train crashed into the rear of a freight train. The flagman aboard the freight frantically waved his lantern, but the engineer of the oncoming train did not stop. The flagman was killed, and ever since a bobbing light has been seen on the tracks at various times where the accident happened.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 37 Issue 2, June 1969, p9-10, il
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Record #:
16387
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Unfortunately, ghosts seem to have been greatly maligned. Often they are seen as hideous creatures that come back with malicious intent. But judging by hundreds of tales, nothing could be farther from the truth.
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Record #:
25248
Author(s):
Abstract:
Ralph Steele reflects on his opinions on swamp ghosts and reminisces about the first time he saw one with his two sons.
Source:
Currents (NoCar TD 171.3 P3 P35x), Vol. 20 Issue 4, Fall 2001, p2, 6, il, por
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Record #:
27593
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Abstract:
The Rhine Research Center in Durham is one of the last institutes in the country devoted to studying parapsychology. Founded by Duke professor Joseph B. Rhine, the center study telepathy, clairvoyance, precognition, psychokinesis, the survival of human personalities existing outside a physical form (ghosts or spirts). The center attempts to quantify their research and also includes the Alex Tanous Library. The library has one of the five largest collections in the country of parapsychological and occult literature. In addition to research, the center offers online educational courses and two monthly public workshops, and organizes various groups.
Source:
Indy Week (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57), Vol. 31 Issue 20, May 2014, p17-19 Periodical Website
Record #:
27704
Author(s):
Abstract:
Steve Barrell is a lead investigator for Haunted North Carolina, a Durham-based nonprofit that conducts investigations of paranormal activity. Barrell and his team focus on data from audio recordings to detect electronic voice phenomena. Barrell works as a legitimate researcher, researching parapsychology in the Triangle Area.
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Record #:
30997
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Abstract:
According to paranormal investigators, just about every community across North Carolina has a stretch of railroad tracks haunted by a train accident victim carrying a lantern, looking for his head. Ghost hunters from the National Society of Paranormal Investigation and Research in Raleigh describe some of the most notable ghost sitings and haunted areas in the state.
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Record #:
31073
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Samuel R. Jocelyn, Jr., son of a distinguished lawyer in Wilmington, North Carolina, was thrown off his horse and pronounced dead in March 1810. According to a tale passed down through the years, the ghost of Samuel appeared several times to his best friend Alexander Hostler, claiming that he had been buried alive. Several bizarre events occur both before and after Jocelyn’s burial.
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Record #:
35177
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The retelling of the spectre cavalry fight which was circulated by newspapers all over the country in 1811. Supposedly, several inhabitants of the pass had seen a ghostly battle ensue, complete with sights, sounds, victors, and losers. Twenty years after the event, the author went to the ravine to explore and was guided by a grandson of one of the original story’s claimants. The guide assured him that it was merely a trick of the light and temperature differences that made the people see what they believed to be a supernatural phenomenon.
Record #:
35469
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Several superstitions and stories concerning the supernatural that was told to the author as a boy by his father.
Record #:
35529
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The story of a man who was riding away from an inn and was nearly robbed on the highway, but was able to shoot the robber. Returning to the inn, he found out the robber had owned the inn with his wife, and they had a habit of robbing and killing the patrons, leaving behind unsettled spirits. Several versions of the story are recounted.
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Record #:
35656
Abstract:
A collection entitled the “Tar-Pitt Tales” relates various stories that are located along the banks of the Tar River. Five of the stories are copied here, “Noey Lee’s Treasure,” “Mrs. Williams’ Ride,” “George Banks,” “Old Nelson House,” and “Death Light.”
Record #:
35686
Abstract:
Hain’ts, not horror films, was thrilling entertainment in Coastal counties such as Sampson and during the author’s youth. As she proved in her illuminations of things that go bump in the dark, though, ghosts chasing and the stories they inspire are really timeless and universal pastimes.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 6 Issue 5, Sept/Oct 1978, p24-25