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43 results for Ghost stories
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Record #:
813
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North Carolina is rich in folklore and folktales, an area of which includes railroad ghost tales.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 60 Issue 5, Oct 1992, p14-17, il
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Record #:
3907
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Late October is the time of ghosts and goblins, of things that glow in the dark or go bump in the night, and a dog howling in the distance. Four creepy Tar Heel tales capture the spookiness of Halloween.
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Record #:
3911
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The Uwharrie Mountains in the Piedmont region have produced their share of ghostly tales that are just perfect for the Halloween season.
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Record #:
3908
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Nancy Roberts is one of the South's foremost compilers of tales of ghosts and the supernatural. Over a period of almost forty years, she has recounted her tales in twenty-three books.
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Record #:
8771
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Slippery Hill Cemetery in Avery County has been the site of a number of strange occurrences since the turn of the century. Local citizens who have reported seeing a hovering light over the cemetery have died shortly after or lost someone close to them. Two men have crashed and died while driving past the cemetery. In the early 1900s, men on horses reported feeling a presence jump on the back of their horses as they rode past the cemetery. To this day, people avoiding looking at the cemetery for fear of seeing the lights.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 49 Issue 11, Apr 1982, p15, 31, il
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Record #:
8782
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Born in 1782, Adam Springs attending the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill where he was one of the first seven graduates. He and his wife lived in Gaston County where they employed a girl to wash and iron his clothes. Her name was Nancy Hanks, and it is rumored her son, Abraham Lincoln, was the son of Adam Springs. Springs spent a great deal of time fish trapping on his property, and he was buried at the gravesite on his land, supposedly upside down, to keep an eye over the fish traps. For years, visitors insisted the gravesite was haunted, and ghost hunters today still go there searching for ghosts.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 48 Issue 2, July 1980, p18-20, il, por
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Record #:
8998
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While watching children play with their grandmothers at a nearby park, the author is reminded of her own grandmother. Her grandmother told ghost tales about the Civil War and the Old West, and sang ballads, several of which are re-counted in this article.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 48 Issue 9, Feb 1981, p8-9, 30, il
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Record #:
9284
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Fred T. Morgan, author of GHOST TALES OF TE UWHARRIES, recaps the original version of one of the folktales found in his 1968 book. It was re-drafted before publication after an anonymous reader suggested a better ending.\r\n
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 47 Issue 7, Dec 1979, p20-21, il
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Record #:
9382
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Legend dictates Purgatory Mountain received its name from Civil War days. A cruel Confederate recruiter living amongst Quaker conscientious objectors forced 22 thirteen and fourteen year old boys into the military. The boys eventually escaped, plotted against, and killed the recruiter whose ghost is said to still roam the mountain.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 42 Issue 8, Jan 1975, p13-15, 55, il
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Record #:
24639
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An excerpt from the 1881 Travel Book ‘In the Heart of the Alleghanies,’ this article presents a true ghost story of the Smoky Mountains that centers around a mid-1800s mill on the Cheowah River. A number of people died there, prompting the mills close down and subsequent rumors that it was haunted.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 26 Issue 19, February 1959, p10-12, 24, il
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Record #:
25432
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All college campuses have ghost stories and East Carolina University is no exception. From residence halls to the McGinnis Theatre, it seems there is a ghost story for almost every building.
Record #:
30997
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According to paranormal investigators, just about every community across North Carolina has a stretch of railroad tracks haunted by a train accident victim carrying a lantern, looking for his head. Ghost hunters from the National Society of Paranormal Investigation and Research in Raleigh describe some of the most notable ghost sitings and haunted areas in the state.
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Record #:
35144
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This article features several haints, or ghost stories, that the author had heard while growing up in Wilkes County.
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Record #:
35194
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The article is divided into two sections: tales about travelers, and ghost stories.
Record #:
35373
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When Governor Scott moved into the Governor’s mansion, the bed from the first governors stay was still in the master bedroom, and when it was removed, a strange knocking on the walls began.
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