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5 results for Treasure troves
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Record #:
7368
Abstract:
North Carolina has a rich history of stories of buried treasure. Over the centuries many North Carolinians, armed with shovels, maps, or just word-of-mouth, have sought these riches. Blackburn discusses some of these treasure troves, including Blackbeard's gold, gold buried by Confederates near the end of the Civil War, and Money Island in Greenville Sound near Wrightsville Beach.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 73 Issue 4, Sept 2005, p84-86, 88, 90, 92, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
9994
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Abstract:
Treasure hunters Bob Dixon, Bill Banks, and Duke Humphrey research historic sights in North Carolina. Once found, they bring metal detectors and shovels to excavate their treasure. The men regularly unearth coins and Civil War artifacts.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 41 Issue 10, Mar 1974, p14-15, 39, por
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Record #:
35156
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Two stories centering on Edward Teach, or Blackbeard’s, time in North Carolina. One is about his time in Bath, and the other is the legend of him burying a chest of money.
Record #:
35656
Abstract:
A collection entitled the “Tar-Pitt Tales” relates various stories that are located along the banks of the Tar River. Five of the stories are copied here, “Noey Lee’s Treasure,” “Mrs. Williams’ Ride,” “George Banks,” “Old Nelson House,” and “Death Light.”
Record #:
35826
Author(s):
Abstract:
Learning part of a song when he was a boy, the author strove to find the full song when he finished high school. As the tale goes, Johnny Sands and Patty Haig married after happening upon a pot of buried treasure. Wanting the gold for herself, Patty Haig attempted to kill Johnny, but ended up dying herself.