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11 results for Fires
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Record #:
7391
Author(s):
Abstract:
On January 30, 1932, in the town of Bladenboro, at the Elm Street home of Council H. Williamson and his wife Lydia, a series of fires occurred in five different rooms of the house. A window shade and a curtain would burn. After this fire was put out, another window shade would catch fire. The most serious happening was when a young girl's dress suddenly ignited. She escaped injury. Later a pair of trousers hanging in a closet took fire. There were twenty fires in all, the last occurring on February 1, 1932. Tomlin discusses the theories that surrounded the fires, from the scientific to the paranormal.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 73 Issue 5, Oct 2005, p140-142, 144-145, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
9288
Abstract:
Built in 1895, the Piney Woods Inn of Southern Pines burned to the ground in thirty minutes. The fire, which took place in 1910, began in the boiler room where a spark from the furnaces had landed on a piece of kindling. Because the inn was made of fat Carolina pine, it burned quickly and firemen were unable to save anything. \r\n
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 47 Issue 8, Jan 1980, p14-15, il
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Record #:
27889
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A few of the items that were destroyed in the recent Chatham County Courthouse fire are detailed. The fire happened during renovations of the courthouse. The weathervane, judge’s bench, jury box, and witness stand are described by residents who restored the items before the fire destroyed them. The loss of historical material cannot be replaced according to Chatham Historical Museum curator Jane Pyle.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 27 Issue 13, March 2010, p7 Periodical Website
Record #:
28485
Author(s):
Abstract:
The history behind the 1934 Great Fire that destroyed the north end of Wrightsville Beach is told. The fire destroyed more than 100 buildings and caused more than a million dollars’ worth of damage. Stories from historians, descendants of those who lived through the event, and former residents tell of the damage and destruction.
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Record #:
22585
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Abstract:
The 1964 graduating class of East Bend High School in Yadkin County, North Carolina endured a lot in their years together. The assassination of President John F. Kennedy began the year while in April the school building burned to the ground during the middle of the night. The school was not fully rebuilt until January of 1965 and the last class of East Bend High School graduated in 1967.
Source:
Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 47 Issue 4, April 2015, p16-18, por
Record #:
28622
Author(s):
Abstract:
Throughout the colonial era, Wilmington town commissioners grappled with the constant threat of fire. Despite the absence of serious fires, a number of precautionary measures were taken to protect the town. Before the Revolution, Wilmington had the most advanced means of fire control of any town in North Carolina.
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Record #:
28614
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An excerpt from the Wilmington Journal gave an extensive description of the fires that destroyed Front Street Methodist Episcopal Church in 1886 and Grace Methodist Church in 1947. Despite the destruction, most of the records stored in the churches were preserved. The records include documents of the founding of the church, mission records, membership lists, birth and death records.
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Record #:
29577
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In November 2016, a widespread fire ignited in the Great Smoky Mountains, a region located on the border of Tennessee and North Carolina. Residents of Gatlinburg, Tennessee describe their experiences during the fire and it impacted their lives.
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Record #:
35656
Abstract:
A collection entitled the “Tar-Pitt Tales” relates various stories that are located along the banks of the Tar River. Five of the stories are copied here, “Noey Lee’s Treasure,” “Mrs. Williams’ Ride,” “George Banks,” “Old Nelson House,” and “Death Light.”
Record #:
35690
Abstract:
Wood was espoused as a viable alternative heat source and solution for the energy crisis. As proof that wood was a cut above the rest economically, the author included examples of the best types, such as ash, beech, and dogwood, and the only necessary equipment, a chain saw and axe.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 6 Issue 5, Sept/Oct 1978, p
Record #:
36160
Author(s):
Abstract:
A combination of written and photo documentation proved the time it took and process involved in a forest’s recovery from a set fire. Through his documentation, the author asserted this action, commonly done in the South every one to five years, can replenish and cleanse its landscape.