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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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18 results for Alternative fuel industry
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Record #:
8494
Abstract:
Reducing greenhouse gas emissions is a necessity in slowing global warming. Methane is one of the strongest greenhouse gases. In Burnsville, Energy Xchange is making creative use of the methane gas that is produced by trash. This innovate project sits atop a capped six-acre landfill and uses the methane gas from it as a fuel source for greenhouses and artists' kilns. Hardee discusses the two programs that the gas fuels. One is three-year residency program for potters and glass blowers. Space is available for four clay artists and two glass artists. The greenhouse component, which is heated by boiler water moving through radiant flooring, is called Project Branch Out and concentrates on growing native plants and seeds.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 74 Issue 8, Jan 2007, p78-80, 82, 84, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
23652
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Blue Ridge Biofuels uses reclaimed vegetable oil to provide an alternative to diesel fuel. At a time when gas prices are rising, biofuels are becoming increasingly popular.
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WNC Magazine (NoCar F261 .W64), Vol. 2 Issue 6, August 2008, p70-79, il, por Periodical Website
Record #:
24006
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The author discusses growing canola in Western North Carolina as part of Field to Fryer to Fuel, a project that creates biofuel from locally-grown feedstock.
Record #:
24188
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Demand for ethanol, distilled from corn, is soaring as a fuel to reduce dependency on foreign oil. The author discusses how farmers are capitalizing on the rising need for corn.
Record #:
25800
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Physicists Yue Wu and Alfred Kleinhammes use nuclear magnetic resonance to find out if carbon-based nanomaterial can effectively store hydrogen. If so, then hydrogen tanks could be used to fuel cars and the only by-product would be water.
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Endeavors (NoCar LD 3941.3 A3), Vol. 24 Issue 1, Fall 2007, p38-40, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
29913
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Abstract:
Electric cars have become more attractive to consumers as environmental stewardship has become increasingly relevant. In the Asheville metropolitan area, there are more than sixty public charging stations for electric cars, some of them solar-powered. The use of electric cars has been promoted as part of efforts to reduce air pollution.
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Record #:
30186
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North Carolina has become an important player in renewable energy, with solar and wind farms and other projects attracting billions of dollars. The investment reflects state law requiring utilities to lessen their reliance on coal, natural gas and nuclear sources.
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Record #:
31521
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Wood is gaining a place as an industrial fuel in North Carolina. The state’s huge brick industry is following the lead of the wood products industry in converting from gas or oil to wood. Studies are also looking at the possibility of using wood in the generation of electricity.
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Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 12 Issue 2, Feb 1980, p26-27, il, por Periodical Website
Record #:
31533
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Abstract:
Studies conducted at North Carolina State University indicate that wood can be used as the sole curing fuel for bulk tobacco barns. Tobacco uses roughly one half of North Carolina’s agricultural energy, excluding livestock. Meanwhile, it has been estimated that North Carolina forests annually produce more than enough wood to cure the total crop.
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Record #:
31565
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Abstract:
Wood could become an important energy source for North Carolina’s industrial firms, farmers and even homeowners. Forestry experts estimate that unutilized tree material and wood residue could provide at least one-hundred-million tons of wood fuel each year. Wood can be made into fuel pellets which would burn better than raw fuels.
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Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 10 Issue 5, May 1978, p10, il, por Periodical Website
Record #:
35687
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The author disclosed that short term costs for installing solar power, whether by flat-plate or heating system, was high. In light of long term benefits, plus its plentitude, Lofton proposed it was an investment worthy alternate fuel source.
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Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 6 Issue 5, Sept/Oct 1978, p27-29
Record #:
35690
Abstract:
Wood was espoused as a viable alternative heat source and solution for the energy crisis. As proof that wood was a cut above the rest economically, the author included examples of the best types, such as ash, beech, and dogwood, and the only necessary equipment, a chain saw and axe.
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Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 6 Issue 5, Sept/Oct 1978, p
Record #:
35843
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Abstract:
Solar power was a commonly perceived power source of the future. The author proved it was an energy source of the ages—harnessed as far back as antiquity, in fact. To prove it a feasible solution for the current energy crisis, he discussed the facility of active and passive solar power. He also proposed how homes could be retrofitted, or equipped, to generate this type of power.
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Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 8 Issue 2, Mar 1980, p23-26, 55-56, 58
Record #:
35893
Abstract:
It was an enlightened response to the energy crisis, educating about an eco-friendly fuel source. Cited were virtues of stoves and types of burners. Observed were good tree types. To remove danger from a daring alternative, provided were books like Using Coal and Wood Burning Stoves Safely and Barnacle Parp’s Chain Saw Guide. As for reasons not prosaic, highlighted were activities generating what he called the “aesthetic charm” of the fireside.
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Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 8 Issue 7, Sept 1980, p14-16
Record #:
36271
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Abstract:
Evident is the promotion of alternative fuel sources and eco-friendly living in the provision of Electric Vehicles (EV) and charging stations. The current availability of both in North Carolina placed the state at number twelve in the nation. The author noted the relative scarcity was felt more in Western North Carolina. She, however, was optimistic about greater receptivity and rise in rank on the horizon for this type of transportation.