NCPI Workmark
Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

Search Results


15 results for Electricity
Currently viewing results 1 - 15
PAGE OF 1
Record #:
4824
Author(s):
Abstract:
Between $60 and $120 million in electricity is stolen every year from North Carolina utilities. Martin discusses steps companies take to prevent theft and how thieves are tracked and caught.
Record #:
24149
Author(s):
Abstract:
A factory in southwest Charlotte produces the equipment used to produce more than a third of the electricity in the United States. The author pre4sents the history of the Westinghouse Pant, now known as the Siemens Plant.
Record #:
28673
Author(s):
Abstract:
Innovation is an expectation that many electric cooperatives and their members have. Recent innovations in use throughout North Carolina’s energy cooperatives are pay-as-you go options, energy management portals and apps, and usage alerts. Newer trends include an increased use of solar farms, microgrids, and connected thermostats in the state.
Source:
Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 48 Issue 4, April 4 2016, p14-15
Record #:
30734
Author(s):
Abstract:
North Carolina Association of Electric Cooperatives coordinates several statewide programs designed to reach young people. The Bright Ideas program, offered by Touchstone Energy Cooperatives, provides funding for teachers interested in developing innovative classroom activities and curricula to teach middle school students about electricity and renewable energy.
Source:
Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 43 Issue 12, Dec 2011, p20, por
Full Text:
Record #:
30891
Author(s):
Abstract:
A shortage of electric capacity, huge increases in demand for power, and the cost of climate change are in the making of a perfect storm. North Carolina electric cooperatives discuss plans to reduce carbon dioxide emissions based on technological solutions including energy efficiency, carbon capture and storage, and renewable sources.
Source:
Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 40 Issue 1, Jan 2008, p10-11, il
Full Text:
Record #:
30897
Author(s):
Abstract:
The North Carolina Transmission Planning Collaborative identified seventeen major transmission projects as part of the 2007-2017 Collaborative Transmission Plan for North Carolina. The projects represent more than four-hundred million dollars in investments for improved electric utilities and transmission.
Source:
Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 40 Issue 3, Mar 2008, p9
Full Text:
Record #:
31302
Author(s):
Abstract:
Jack Blevins is now receiving electricity at his remote cabin in Ashe County, North Carolina. Last fall, Blevins and his now-deceased brother, Tom, came to the attention of the Blue Ridge Opportunities Commission. The Blevins brothers were living in a dilapidated wooden shack with no electricity, but with the help of volunteers, the commission built them a new cabin wired for electricity.
Source:
Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 21 Issue 6, June 1989, p10, por
Record #:
31367
Author(s):
Abstract:
Rural electrification helped to create a whole new way of life for rural people. North Carolina’s rural electric cooperatives have launched a statewide oral history project to preserve the personal recollections of early co-op organizers and the first generation of Tar Heel co-op consumer-members. About fifty volunteers will be tape recording interviews with members and pioneer co-op directors and employees as part of the project.
Source:
Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 16 Issue 10, Oct 1984, p9, por
Record #:
32012
Author(s):
Abstract:
At the 29th annual meeting of the National Rural Electric Cooperative Association, rural electric leaders, including representatives of North Carolina’s electric membership, considered the dimensions of the energy crisis. This article discusses how North Carolina plans to find solutions in obtaining an adequate supply of dependable, economical electric power.
Source:
Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 3 Issue 4, Apr 1971, p8-11
Record #:
35319
Author(s):
Abstract:
The definition for a transformer included how they operate, voltage levels appropriate for their stations and substations, and the ubiquitous presence of this electronic equipment in daily life.
Source:
Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 47 Issue 6, June 2015, p14
Subject(s):
Record #:
35557
Author(s):
Abstract:
The need for electricity was pressing—twofold more every seven years for rapidly growing areas. The problems contributing to the crisis: shortage of fossil fuels and residents’ reluctance to have electric generating station in their backyard. Westinghouse Electric Company, coupled with Offshore Power Systems, proved the crisis could be averted, the problems were not insurmountable. Their solution for anyone seeking an alternative fuel source and/or not wanting generating stations within sight: nuclear power plants offshore.
Source:
New East (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 1 Issue 2, Mar/Apr 1973, p18-19, 42-44
Record #:
35760
Author(s):
Abstract:
The author reflected on the value that wood stoves, existing before the widespread adoption of electricity Down East during the 1940s, had for the region’s people. Leggett offered illustrations such as the better tastes of wood stove cooked foods, stories featuring family members like the author’s mother, and the important role these stoves played during holidays such as Christmas.
Source:
Record #:
35421
Author(s):
Abstract:
The electrical relationship between outlets and receptacles was explored through factors such as type, function, and recommended installation locations for receptacles. For the non-mechanically inclined, included were some interesting facts.
Source:
Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 47 Issue 7, July 2015, p14-15
Record #:
35992
Abstract:
A true down homer was about more than just being born in a local town or having one’s name affiliated with a local building. What made Charlie Gray Sr. so included turning down job offers after graduation from North Carolina State College, so he could own a local grocery store. Being a down homer was also reflected in his promotion of education for the area. During his almost fifty year career as a school principal and teacher, he professed a hope for Hatteras Island to have a central accredited high school.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 3 Issue 3, July 1976, p72-77
Record #:
36271
Author(s):
Abstract:
Evident is the promotion of alternative fuel sources and eco-friendly living in the provision of Electric Vehicles (EV) and charging stations. The current availability of both in North Carolina placed the state at number twelve in the nation. The author noted the relative scarcity was felt more in Western North Carolina. She, however, was optimistic about greater receptivity and rise in rank on the horizon for this type of transportation.