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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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11 results for Electric industries
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Record #:
10418
Abstract:
The General Electric Company operates four plants at Asheboro, Goldsboro, Hendersonville, and Hickory, with a combined factory space of 853,000 square-feet. Products range from lamp bulb components to distribution transformers. Information on products from each plant is included.
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Record #:
24149
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A factory in southwest Charlotte produces the equipment used to produce more than a third of the electricity in the United States. The author pre4sents the history of the Westinghouse Pant, now known as the Siemens Plant.
Record #:
28551
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North Carolina Electric Cooperatives attended the 75th annual meeting of the National Rural Electric Cooperative Association. North Carolina representatives discussed communication methods during storm-related outages, voltage management, and sound board governance.
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Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 49 Issue 4, April 2017, p12-13, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
30547
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In the northwest corner of North Carolina, new horizons are taking place in the rapidly expanding field of electronics. In the Blue Ridge country, a modern branch plant of the Sprague Electric Company, the world's largest manufacturer of capacitors, is setting a record for growth. The Ashe County plant will eventually employ 250 persons in the manufacture of dry electrolytic capacitors.
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Record #:
30697
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North Carolina electric cooperatives are facing increasing pressures from new government regulations, rising fuel and materials costs, escalating demand for electricity, and required investments in both adding generation and upgrading existing power plants. This article discusses these different pressures and how they are impacting consumer electric bills.
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Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 43 Issue 1, Jan 2011, p12-13, il, bibl Periodical Website
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Record #:
31163
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On August 14, 2003, a series of equipment outages in the Midwest led to uncontrolled cascading outages of power transmission lines and generators serving North Carolina and other northern areas for up to fifty hours. Questions and answers about the power outage are provided in this article, as well as a discussion on operating procedures for massive outages.
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Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 35 Issue 10, Oct 2003, p11, il, por Periodical Website
Record #:
31217
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Abstract:
As state governments consider electric industry changes nationwide, utilities gain opportunities to offer more serves to more customers. This article presents an interview with Chuck Terrillon how North Carolina electric cooperatives are preparing for a restructured electric utility industry. Terrillon is the CEO of the companies organized by North Carolina’s electric cooperatives.
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Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 33 Issue 1, Jan 2001, p12-13, por Periodical Website
Record #:
31228
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The North Carolina Electric Membership Corporation, along with Duke Power, North Carolina’s municipal electric utilities, and others, are members of the Southeastern Electric Reliability Council, a regional group established to ensure a reliable and adequate bulk power supply. This article describes how electricity is transmitted throughout the region, and discusses deregulation and other potential changes which may impact North Carolina’s utility industry.
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Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 33 Issue 7, July 2001, p11-14, il, map Periodical Website
Record #:
31309
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Unit One of the Catawba Nuclear Plant has produced its first electricity as part of preliminary testing of the facility, which is partially owned by North Carolina’s Electric Membership Corporations. The plant, which is located in York County, South Carolina, nineteen miles southwest of Charlotte, is a joint venture involving electric co-ops, municipalities and Duke Power Company.
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Record #:
31418
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North Carolina’s Electric Membership Corporations have launched a new statewide effort to help state and local officials entice new industries into building plants within co-op service areas. This article explores how a major industry, dubbed the “Snowbird” plant, chose its site in Wake Forest and impacted the Wake County community.
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Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 15 Issue 9, Sept 1983, p10-12, il, por Periodical Website
Record #:
31424
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North Carolina’s electric cooperatives are profiling prime industrial sites as part of a new determination to become a visible force in the competitive bidding for major industrial plants. They are doing this economic development “homework” so they can speak fluently with industry representatives about how much their territories have to offer. New industrial operations would improve the economy of the state’s rural areas.
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