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11 results for Electric utilities--Laws and legislation
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Record #:
3587
Author(s):
Abstract:
Deregulation of power companies would mean electricity could soon be sold on the open market. Concerns to be addressed include whether the state needs deregulation, how it would work, how costs will be distributed, and who will pay for it.
Source:
North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 56 Issue 3, Mar 1998, p16-18,20-21, il
Record #:
7711
Author(s):
Abstract:
As a city's borders spread outward and housing development follows, the city's electric power system often encroaches into areas long served by electric cooperatives. When two power providers each serve an area, all consumers pay for unnecessary power lines. Electric service in the state is governed by Senate Bill 512, known as the Territory Law, which was passed in 1965. The NC General Assembly recently modernized the law. The updated law creates more efficiency in planning for growth and a new framework for determining which utility will serve a growing area.
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Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 38 Issue 2, Feb 2006, p12-13, il
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Record #:
30697
Author(s):
Abstract:
North Carolina electric cooperatives are facing increasing pressures from new government regulations, rising fuel and materials costs, escalating demand for electricity, and required investments in both adding generation and upgrading existing power plants. This article discusses these different pressures and how they are impacting consumer electric bills.
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Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 43 Issue 1, Jan 2011, p12-13, il, bibl
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Record #:
31289
Author(s):
Abstract:
The poles and lines of North Carolina’s electric cooperatives run through some of the most challenging terrain in the state. The legal right that utilities have to go on land for system maintenance purposes is called a right-of-way or ROW. This article discusses three types of ROW management, which include mechanical, manual and herbicidal methods.
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Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 31 Issue 7, July 1999, p14-16, il, por
Record #:
31361
Author(s):
Abstract:
In this article, the 1984 candidates for the United States Senate and the United States House of Representative discuss their views on a proposal for shoring up the rural electric program’s financing mechanism. They also discuss their priorities for services to rural areas in North Carolina.
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Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 16 Issue 4, Apr 1984, p26-29, il
Record #:
31369
Author(s):
Abstract:
Balloting for the 1984 election campaign begins on November 6. North Carolina voters will cast ballots in the race for president while choosing their representatives to serve in the Governor’s Mansion, the United States Senate and various state and local government posts. This article presents biographical profiles of the candidates, and their views on legislation for rural electric cooperatives.
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Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 16 Issue 10, Oct 1984, p18-24, il, por, map
Record #:
31398
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission has decided that North Carolina rural electric cooperatives should help their power suppliers finance new power plants that are still under construction. The ruling, which would bring higher power bills for the consumer-members, allows an investor-owned utility to charge its wholesale customers up to half the cost of financing power plant construction work while the work is still being done.
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Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 15 Issue 5, May 1983, p4-5
Record #:
31651
Author(s):
Abstract:
Electric rates in North Carolina need to be completely revamped to incorporate a time-of-day pricing system similar to the system used for telephone rates, says State Senator McNeil Smith of Greensboro. This article discusses the peak load pricing system of electricity and North Carolina legislation.
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Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 7 Issue 11, Nov 1975, p8-9, il, por
Record #:
35313
Author(s):
Abstract:
The author noted that attacks closing down the electric grid are most likely to occur in Hollywood reel life. The unlikelihood of it occurring in real life was asserted by coordination efforts by the federal government, the responsibilities of grid security, requirements developed by a non-profit organization certified by the federal government, and best practices to prepare for and prevent attacks.
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Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 47 Issue 5, May 2015, p12
Record #:
35329
Author(s):
Abstract:
The pole attachment in question is jointly provided by two companies to avoid having to build their own poles. Or at least building a pole attachment is between two electric cooperatives. For the legal work related to their implications, state legislature is responsible, and this can be a challenging process. With over two million of North Carolinians reliant of coop power, though, the effort can be perceived as worth it.
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Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 47 Issue 9, September 2015, p11
Record #:
35222
Author(s):
Abstract:
For the National Rural Electric Cooperative Association, the next greatest thing generated a discussion of topics such as the changing landscape for cooperative power supplies, technology trends, and the upcoming national elections.
Source:
Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 48 Issue 4, April 4 2016, p16-17