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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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40 results for Electric utilities
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Record #:
258
Abstract:
Utility companies are diversifying into solar products, home insulation, even cable television. But, unlike other corporations, they have a state-awarded monopoly franchise for their principal product.
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NC Insight (NoCar JK 4101 .N3x), Vol. 6 Issue 4, Jan 1984, p13-27, il, bibl, f
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Record #:
2163
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In an era of increased competition and relatively slow growth, Duke Power's CEO William H. Grigg is guiding the company into new areas such as power development in Latin America and the Pacific Rim, world-wide engineering services, and Duke Net.
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North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 53 Issue 2, Feb 1995, p8-11, il
Record #:
3748
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Over one hundred electric utilities, including those of city governments and consumer-owned cooperatives, provide the state's electricity services. Each utility operates in an assigned area.
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Record #:
4824
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Between $60 and $120 million in electricity is stolen every year from North Carolina utilities. Martin discusses steps companies take to prevent theft and how thieves are tracked and caught.
Record #:
7056
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North Carolina has twenty-seven electric cooperatives that supply power to 2.5 million residential and small business customers. These electric suppliers differ from the big companies, like Duke Energy, in that they are owned by their members, who elect a board of directors to set rates and policies. Every cooperative member is guaranteed a voice in decisions. Each cooperative is in the community it serves and is therefore more in touch with what the local needs are. Rafferty discusses some cooperatives, including the Roanoke, Randolph, Edgecombe-Martin County, Albemarle, and Tri-County Electric Cooperatives.
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North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 63 Issue 1, Jan 2005, p38-43, il
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Record #:
7299
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David Hauser, who has worked for Duke Energy Corp. for thirty-one years, was named the company's chief financial officer in February 2004. Hauser started with what was then Duke Power in 1973 as an accountant. He was named comptroller in 1987 and was senior vice-president and treasurer before assuming his present position.
Record #:
7710
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There are over one hundred separately organized electric utilities that serve customers in North Carolina. Depending on the location of an individual's home or place of employment, electric service could be provided from a consumer-owned cooperative, an investor-owner utility, a city government, or some other utility operating in the state. Each type of service covers a designated area.
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Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 38 Issue 2, Feb 2006, p14-15, map Periodical Website
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Record #:
7804
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Two of the state's Touchstone Energy cooperatives received recognition for the care they take in the management of trees and other vegetation affecting power lines and poles. Union Power Cooperative is the first North Carolina utility to be named a Tree Line USA Utility. This award is sponsored by the National Arbor Day Foundation and the National Association of State Foresters. The Dow AgroSciences industry magazine, Right-of-Way Vistas, recognized Pee Dee Electric for its right-of-way vegetation management program. The cooperatives serve a region between Charlotte and Lumberton.
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Record #:
8050
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There are over 1,430 highway historical markers in North Carolina. The state's newest marker is located south of Tarboro on Hwy 33. It was unveiled in July 2006, on the 70th anniversary of the founding of the state's first electric cooperative, Edgecombe-Martin County Electric Membership Cooperation, and recognizes the place where an electric cooperative first brought power to rural North Carolina.
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Record #:
8092
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Thomas, CEO of North Carolina Membership Corp., discusses the impact the state's twenty-seven electric cooperatives have on the North Carolina economy. These cooperatives have been in operation over sixty years. They recently commissioned an independent study to determine how much they contribute to the economy. The study reveals that electric cooperatives pump about $1.63 billion a year into the economy; employ over 2,500 people; pay $57.8 annually in state and local taxes; and pay over $93 million in wages and salaries.
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North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 64 Issue 9, Sept 2006, p4, il
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Record #:
8391
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North Carolina's population is growing. Electric cooperatives that have primarily served rural areas are adapting to service more families and commercial facilities in places that were recently croplands and woodlands. Top executives in three of North Carolina's fastest-growing cooperatives discuss changes that are occurring in their service areas: Union County; Ashe and Watauga Counties; and the Albemarle Sound area.
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Record #:
8999
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Much of the original electric wiring in Asheville's Biltmore Mansion is still intact in the three underground stories. Power for the house was originally taken from the nearby trolley line and converted into usable voltage. Although power is now supplied by Carolina Power and Light Company, many of the other technological marvels are still in use today.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 48 Issue 9, Feb 1981, p10-12, il, por
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Record #:
9647
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Thomas discusses major issues and concerns facing electric cooperatives today in planning for the future of energy in North Carolina. Among them are growth in state population projected for 50 percent over the next twenty-five years, climate change, energy supply, and costs.
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Record #:
10312
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North Carolina's population is growing rapidly. By 2030, it will reach twelve million, making the state the seventh largest in the nation. Demand for energy is also keeping pace with this growth. Hughes discusses what steps Progress Energy Carolinas (formerly Carolina Power & Light) is taking to meet this increasing need for electricity.
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Record #:
10879
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William Bulgin McGuire, president of Duke Power Company, is featured in this month's We The People Magazine's North Carolina Businessman in the News.
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