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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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15 results for Cooking
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Record #:
27289
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Abstract:
Sorgum syrup has been a tradition in the mountains of North Carolina for years. Now the syrup’s popularity is spreading throughout the state due to a number of chef’s using it in their dishes.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 84 Issue 5, October 2016, p182-184, 186, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
27797
Abstract:
The Cookery will open as Durham’s first culinary incubator and certified kitchen space for rent. Entrepreneurs Nick Hawthorne-Johnson and Rochelle Johnson have opened the kitchen available 24/7 for rent to local businesses and individuals like food truck owners, artisanal bakers, or anyone without a permanent restaurant location. As a small business incubator, The Cookery will also offer business, marketing, and communications classes through Johnson’s Row Design Studios.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 28 Issue 14, April 2011, p39 Periodical Website
Record #:
27796
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Award winning Chapel Hill chef Andrea Reusing discusses the large community of local food growers, suppliers, and cooks in the Triangle area and her new cookbook. Her cookbook focuses upon the kinds of foods grown and raised in the Triangle and the times of year each crop is available. She also discusses specific farms or stories throughout the area to get certain ingredients and popular food-related terms used in the Triangle.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 28 Issue 14, April 2011, p32-33 Periodical Website
Record #:
29676
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The Farm, located in Candler, North Carolina, is an event center, a retreat location, a rustic wedding destination, a state-of-the-art experiential teaching kitchen and a gathering place. The owners, Myron and Beverly Gottfried, teach cooking classes and host culinary escapes. The culinary ingredients are grown at the farm or locally sourced.
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Record #:
29747
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The Asheville area is known as a farm-to-table mecca. Businesses such as The Farm, Franny’s Farm, Thyme in the Garden, and Villagers offer training and workshops in cooking, growing food, gardening and farming.
Record #:
31057
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The Goodness Grows in North Carolina program is sponsoring the first statewide “Best Dish in NC” contest to determine who serves the finest local fare. There are eight restaurants in the final round, and each finalist will serve and feature their entry dish at their restaurant for four weeks. A list and description of the eight restaurants and feature dishes is provided in this article.
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Record #:
31254
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This article presents a selection of the finest family recipes in North Carolina. Citizens share their stories and recipes, and describe the meaning of the dishes. Several of the recipes are for pork chops, jam cake, cornbread, molasses cake, honey buns, and spaghetti.
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Record #:
31478
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Some of our favorite foods come from old techniques to make cheaper meats better.
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Record #:
34858
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The three basic components of a pie are the crust, filling, and meringue. If a baker can perfect these three skills, then any pie can be created.
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Record #:
35630
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The use of molding baked goods has a long, symbolic history; the molds have been simple or very intricate. For Christmas time, cookies were commonly molded into biblical scenes, but eventually became simpler, along with the recipes that made them. The author included several pictures of molds that were used in Switzerland and Germany.
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Record #:
35760
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The author reflected on the value that wood stoves, existing before the widespread adoption of electricity Down East during the 1940s, had for the region’s people. Leggett offered illustrations such as the better tastes of wood stove cooked foods, stories featuring family members like the author’s mother, and the important role these stoves played during holidays such as Christmas.
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Record #:
35909
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Perhaps worthy of making the annals of local restaurant history was one frequented by Pitt County locals and East Carolina University students. Among its county charms were home cooked food and iced tea that may be worth writing home about.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 8 Issue 8, Oct 1980, p42
Record #:
36437
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The author traveled to all 100 counties in North Carolina to seek out local cooks and their recipes and stories. A sampler of this collection is reproduced in this article.
Record #:
38067
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In order to have good fish for eating, the author supplies several tips that can lead to success.
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Record #:
38167
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The author answers how to prepare a tasty carp dinner.
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