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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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18 results for Fisheries
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Record #:
904
Abstract:
This entire issue is devoted to North Carolina's fisheries, one of the state's most important natural resources.
Source:
North Carolina State Economist (NoCar HD 1401 T34), Vol. Issue , Nov 1992, p1-4, bibl, f
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Record #:
1939
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North Carolina's coastline has become a battleground for commercial and recreational fishermen competing for the same water and fish. Nickens presents the case for a negotiated settlement between the warring factions.
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Friend of Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 42 Issue 2, Spring 1994, p2-5, por
Record #:
2858
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Commercial fishing's powerful machinery, nets, and technology have replaced the muscle-powered boats of the 1800s. Bigger nets, though, affect the environment through over fishing and accidental kills of other fish and animals.
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Record #:
5077
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North Carolina commercial fishermen experienced their second-lowest catch in 27 years, with landings of 154.1 million pounds of fish and shellfish in 2000. However, their market value was the third largest on record at $108.3 million. The top five harvested species were Atlantic menhaden, blue crabs (hard), shrimp, Atlantic croaker, and spiny dogfish shark
Record #:
7341
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In the summer of 2005, Jerry Schill will end eighteen years as president of the North Carolina Fisheries Association. The trade organization has represented North Carolina's commercial fishing interests since 1952. Schill reflects on the status of commercial fishing in North Carolina. He and his wife are retiring to a 100-acre dairy farm in Pennsylvania.
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Record #:
7359
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Issues that have buffeted North Carolina's commercial fishing industry over the past decade include declining fish stocks, competition from abroad, rising costs for fuel and maintenance, closings of polluted harvesting grounds, and storms. Because of this, many fishermen no longer depend on fishing for their sole means of livelihood. Currently 70 percent of them hold land-based jobs to make ends meet. Smith examines how a number of the fishermen are keeping afloat in these hard times.
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Record #:
8234
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Commercial fishermen in the state face an increasingly difficult life. They deal with intense state and federal regulations, while facing stiff competition from foreign imports. Fish houses are disappearing, leaving fewer places to sell catches. Boats slips are losing out to developments. A new factor is the tension that exists between commercial fisherman and recreational anglers. Wilson discusses reasons for this tension and what can be done about it.
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Record #:
8555
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Along the North Carolina coast a hostile relationship exists between recreational and commercial fishermen. Each group for their own reasons fears the other and what they might do. Leutze discusses some of the perceptions the two groups have of each other. For example, commercial fishermen feel recreational ones are insufficiently regulated, while they have to deal with all kinds of rules, regulations, and quotas. Recreational fishermen think that commercial people are unconcerned about exploiting the fisheries. Leutze suggests airing these perceptions to reach a middle ground. For example, commercial fishermen do care about the fisheries because their livelihood depends on them.
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Record #:
9357
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The multi-million dollar Wanchese Harbor Project intends to fully realize efforts made in 1820 to transform Wanchese Harbor on Roanoke Island into a revenue generating venture that will benefit North Carolina's fishing and tourist industries. The project will afford “the most completely integrated seafood facility in the United States.”
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 42 Issue 6, Nov 1974, p12-13, il, por
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Record #:
12410
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Wienke discusses the effect flooding from Hurricane Floyd had on blue crab, oysters, bay scallop fisheries and the fisherman who harvest them.
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Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue , Autumn 2009, p25-27, il Periodical Website
Record #:
21556
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During the colonial and antebellum periods of North Carolina's history, plantation owners developed fisheries to provide food for slave workforces. These fisheries were disrupted by Union troops and escaped slaves during the Civil War. After the cease of hostilities, the fishery industry grew quickly as the result of several factors including the expansion of steamboat and railroad lines, the completion of the deep-draft canal to Norfolk, Virginia, and market preferences towards fresh food and away from salted. North Carolina fisheries did not develop as extensively as New England fisheries because of the isolation of North Carolina fisheries, its warm climate, seasonal/migratory fish, and the lack of incentive to develop fisheries since productive farming land was available.
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Record #:
25209
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Several topics will be discussed at the Marine Fisheries Commission hearings. Topics will include trawling in inshore waters, larger mesh size in tailbags on crab trawls and area closure to water trawling.
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Currents (NoCar TD 171.3 P3 P35x), Vol. 13 Issue 2, Winter 1994, p1
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Record #:
25948
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Preliminary findings have discovered that organic water pollution is creating the conditions for disease among game fish in North Carolina’s fishing lakes. The disease, which has been found to be present in all southeastern states, produces sores lesions on the fish skin, scales, and mouths. Pollution from sewage, industrial waste, and runoff produce the conditions which favor the condition to be spread among populations; however, at the time there is no particular solution except to limit pollution into the river and lake systems.
Source:
Friend O’ Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 17 Issue 1, 1974, p6
Record #:
5495
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Overfishing a species is not a new phenomenon, nor is it limited to the United States. Historical evidence indicates its practice centuries ago by Native Americans and other cultures around the world. Deen discusses links between overfishing and other ecological problems, including invasive species and altering the food web, and what the future holds.
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Record #:
8011
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North Carolina's commercial fishing harvest continues to drop. The 2005 harvest of finfish and shellfish totaled 79 million pounds, valued at $64.9 million. This is the smallest harvest on record and continues the downward trend that began in 1997. The menhaden catch was low, and blue crabs and shrimp, two other commercial mainstays, had decreased landings.
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