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12 results for Saltwater fishing
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Record #:
1939
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North Carolina's coastline has become a battleground for commercial and recreational fishermen competing for the same water and fish. Nickens presents the case for a negotiated settlement between the warring factions.
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Friend of Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 42 Issue 2, Spring 1994, p2-5, por
Record #:
2420
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Thousands of recreational saltwater fishermen visit the state's estuaries and coastal waters each year for the challenges of fishing inshore and offshore for fish like spot, red drum, wahoo, and king mackerel.
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Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue , July/Aug 1995, p14-17, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
6712
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Green discusses the new federal permit that is required for private recreational fishing boats that target highly migratory species, or HMS. The regulations cover species including sharks, tunas, swordfishes, and billfishes. The permits are required for anglers doing catch-and-release fishing or landing the fish.
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Record #:
6893
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Will Morgan, executive director of the North Carolina chapter of the Coastal Conservation Association, worked with the North Carolina General Assembly to help pass legislation creating a saltwater fishing license. The issue, which had been debated for over a decade, passed in 2004. North Carolina was the only state between Texas and Delaware that did not have this license. The license is a user fee and costs $15 annually or $1 for a seven-day permit. Fees will be used for marine projects and scholarships for students pursuing marine science degrees.
Record #:
8139
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Beginning on January 1, 2007, most anglers who fish in coastal and ocean waters of the state must have a new Coastal Recreational Fishing License. Previously, North Carolina was the last state in the Southeast without a recreational saltwater license. Saltwater fishing is big business in the state with over a million people fishing each year. The new license will aid the North Carolina Division of Marine Fisheries in collecting crucial data to help the agency better manage fish stocks.
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Record #:
16658
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Leutze discusses the debate on the definition of a commercial fisherman and the restriction on the use of the funds generated by the saltwater fishing license.
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Record #:
26534
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Catch-and-release has become significant for anglers in North Carolina coastal waters. To preserve resources, state and federal regulations now determine limits for many saltwater game fish. There is also growing popularity of tagging programs that award money to fishermen and help scientists determine the age of fish.
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Friend of Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 37 Issue 4, July/Aug 1990, p10-11, il
Record #:
26592
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Saltwater fishing has long been viewed as one of the last free recreational sporting activities left in North Carolina. Now there is debate over possible saltwater license requirements. The state would benefit financially from a license system, but there are mixed feelings among local businesses and commercial fishermen.
Source:
Friend of Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 36 Issue 6, Nov/Dec 1989, p6-7, il, por
Record #:
9513
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Results of the 1977 Saltwater Fishing Tournament reveal that two of the catches set state records, and one tied a state record. New state records were set for black bass and tarpon while the record for spot was tied. A chart lists the species, minimum qualifying weight, largest fish, catch location, winner, and state record.
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Record #:
1644
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Oregon Inlet at North Carolina's Outer Banks has a reputation for being one of the most productive sport fishing areas along the entire Atlantic Coast.
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Record #:
6890
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The 2004 North Carolina General Assembly passed legislation creating a saltwater fishing license. The issue had been debated for over a decade. Fishermen will not be required to have the license until January 1, 2006. Then residents and nonresidents who fish from the shore or a boat in the state's marine waters will be required to purchase the $15 license annually. Vacationers may purchase a seven-day license for $1.
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Record #:
13859
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At one time thirty-six fishing piers jutted out from the state's coastline into the Atlantic Ocean. Now only eighteen remain. Natural disasters claimed some. Others have fallen victim to accelerated development and soaring land costs which have enticed owners to sell their piers for a substantial profit. Fishing piers and the culture they engendered seem to be disappearing forever. Oak Island seeks to keep this tradition alive and provide public access to saltwater fishing through the purchase of the former Yaupon Pier.
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