NCPI Workmark
Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

Search Results


12 results for Wharton, Rachael
Currently viewing results 1 - 12
PAGE OF 1
Record #:
2348
Author(s):
Abstract:
Masonboro Island, a part of the North Carolina National Estuarine Research Reserve, has remained undisturbed since it was discovered. Unlike its neighbors, Wrightsville Beach and Carolina Beach, it has not been commercialized.
Source:
Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue , Mar/Apr 1995, p2-9, il Periodical Website
Record #:
2421
Author(s):
Abstract:
The town of Oriental in Pamlico County has more sailboats than its population of 800 and calls itself \"The Sailing Capital of the Carolinas.\" Located on the Neuse River, the town attracts people who enjoy sailing and the easygoing lifestyle.
Source:
Record #:
2420
Author(s):
Abstract:
Thousands of recreational saltwater fishermen visit the state's estuaries and coastal waters each year for the challenges of fishing inshore and offshore for fish like spot, red drum, wahoo, and king mackerel.
Source:
Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue , July/Aug 1995, p14-17, il Periodical Website
Subject(s):
Record #:
2550
Author(s):
Abstract:
Autumn along the state's coastline is a time of change, with vivid colors in marshes and maritime forests, fish and fowl migrating, and turtles and other animals resting or hibernating.
Source:
Record #:
2619
Author(s):
Abstract:
Established in 1938 by President Franklin Roosevelt, the Pea Island National Wildlife Refuge in Dare County is a wintering habitat for waterfowl, some from as far away as Canada, Alaska, and the Arctic.
Source:
Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue , Nov/Dec 1995, p2-9, il Periodical Website
Record #:
2744
Author(s):
Abstract:
The coastal forests, swamps, and bays contain the state's largest black bear population. Almost 5,000 of the elusive creatures roam an area of 5.5 million acres.
Source:
Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue , Jan/Feb 1996, p16-19, il Periodical Website
Subject(s):
Record #:
2831
Author(s):
Abstract:
The starfish is one of the most recognizable of sea dwellers. While there are over 2,000 species worldwide, only 30 to 40 live in state waters. Of those, most are found south of Cape Hatteras.
Source:
Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue , Mar/Apr 1996, p14-15, il Periodical Website
Record #:
2912
Author(s):
Abstract:
The small town of Calabash, a collection of sleepy streets and over twenty restaurants, is legendary for seafood. However, as the town grows, it must deal with familiar issues of land use and sewage treatment.
Source:
Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue , May/June 1996, p10-15, il Periodical Website
Record #:
3018
Author(s):
Abstract:
Natural vegetative buffers, or grasslands, shrubs, and forests that grow on banks of streams and rivers, are effective in filtering nonpoint pollutants and improving water quality.
Source:
Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue , July/Aug 1996, p12-15, il Periodical Website
Record #:
3086
Author(s):
Abstract:
Although snakes want to avoid us as much as we want to avoid them, the mere sight of one brings fear to people. Thirty-eight species live in the state, but only six are poisonous.
Source:
Subject(s):
Record #:
3142
Author(s):
Abstract:
In 1798, fire destroyed Tryon Palace in New Bern, only twenty-eight years after its completion. In the 1920s, citizens began to work for its reconstruction, and on April 9, 1959, the palace opened to the public.
Source:
Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue , Nov/Dec 1996, p8-11, il Periodical Website
Record #:
3141
Abstract:
Christmas tours of New Bern's Tryon Palace and other historic sites, including the John Wright Stanley House, give visitors a feel for Christmas celebrations from the 1770s onward.
Source:
Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue , Nov/Dec 1996, p2-7, il Periodical Website