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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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21 results for Waterfowl
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Record #:
2619
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Established in 1938 by President Franklin Roosevelt, the Pea Island National Wildlife Refuge in Dare County is a wintering habitat for waterfowl, some from as far away as Canada, Alaska, and the Arctic.
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Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue , Nov/Dec 1995, p2-9, il Periodical Website
Record #:
8245
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Mike and Ali Lubbock founded the Sylvan Heights Waterfowl Center in Scotland Neck in Halifax County in 1989. Covering about nine acres, the center boasts the largest collection of waterfowl in the world and is a conservation and research orientated center for birds, especially rare and endangered waterfowl. Sylvan Heights contains around 3,000 birds and 170 species, including 30 species that cannot be seen in any other collection or zoo in North America.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 74 Issue 6, Nov 2006, p32-34, 35-36, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
16536
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Sylvan Heights Waterfowl Park and Eco Center is one of North Carolina's best-kept secrets, but the park houses more than 1500 ducks, geese, swans, and other birds--some among the rarest in the world--from South America, North America, Europe, Africa, Asia, and Australia.
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Record #:
18719
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Sylvan Heights Bird Park and Eco Center, located in Scotland Neck in Halifax County, is one of North Carolina's best-kept secrets. Mike and Ali Lubbock operate the center which boasts the largest collection of waterfowl in the world and is a conservation and research orientated center for birds, especially rare and endangered waterfowl. Sylvan contains about 2,000 birds. The park opened to the public in 2006.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 80 Issue 9, Feb 2013, p72-85, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
24832
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North Carolina is home to both resident and migrant birds throughout the year. Some birds, such as Blue Jays, are permanent residents of the state, while others, like the Prothonotary Warbler are migrants who fly to Central and South America for the winter. Other birds, like the Yellow-bellied Sapsucker migrate from Canada to North Carolina for the winter. This article describes a number of these birds and details their navigational abilities.
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Record #:
25311
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Matt Little describes all the potential waterfowl one can see in and around the Pamlico-Tar River. These species are available for the waterfowl hunter or watcher.
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Currents (NoCar TD 171.3 P3 P35x), Vol. 26 Issue 5, Winter 2008, p3, il
Record #:
26301
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Due to increased protection of breeding grounds and good weather, waterfowl wintering in North Carolina have increased over the last year.
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Friend O’ Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 22 Issue 1, Winter 1978, p17-18
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Record #:
26627
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The long-continued and severe drought has inflicted widespread devastation among waterfowl populations in North Carolina. The dry weather has accelerated the loss of wetlands and essential habitat for waterfowl breeding and nesting.
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Friend of Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 35 Issue 6, Nov/Dec 1988, p16-17, il
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Record #:
26669
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North Carolina waterfowlers face an uncertain future if water pollution in the Pamlico River continues. The return of wintering ducks to the sound depends cleaning the water and fostering growth of submerged grasses.
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Friend of Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 32 Issue 1, Jan/Feb 1985, p5, por
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Record #:
8186
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Waterfowl depend on water. They nest on water, raise their young there, and feed in or near water. Without suitable nesting and wintering sites, waterfowl will not survive. Between 1940 and 1964, over forty-five million acres of wetlands were drained throughout the country. Protection of wetlands is vital to waterfowl survival. A major goal of waterfowl management is to blunt the impact of man's activities on ducks and geese. Poole discusses what has been done in the past, what is being done today, and what wildlife agencies hope to do in the future, and why.
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Record #:
8193
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In Part II of his series, Poole continues his discussion of the plight of the North American waterfowl.
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Record #:
9974
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Waterfowl restoration in the state involves protecting and enhancing wintering habitats for birds that are born far to the north. Monschein discusses several programs that have this goal: Canada Goose Field Sanctuary/Feeding Area Program, North American Waterfowl Management Plan, and the M.A.R.S.H. Program.
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Record #:
26744
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There was a two-percent increase in waterfowl harvests this year. Wood ducks comprised the majority of hunting harvests, followed by mallards and snow geese.
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Friend of Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 31 Issue 5, Sept/Oct 1984, p6
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Record #:
8232
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Migratory waterfowl have wintered in North Carolina over the centuries. Following some mysterious, invisible pathway through the sky, the birds fly in from the Dakotas, Canada, and far beyond the Artic Circle. Hester describes some of these autumnal visitors, including the mallard, wood duck, northern pintail, American wigeon, and tundra swan.
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Record #:
10056
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Mike and Ali Lubbock founded the Sylvan Heights Waterfowl Park and Eco-Center in Scotland Neck in Halifax County in 1989. Covering about nine acres, the center boasts the largest collection of waterfowl in the world and is a conservation and research orientated center for birds, especially rare and endangered waterfowl. The center contains about 1,000 birds representing over 170 species from six continents.
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