NCPI Workmark
Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

Search Results


19 results for Drought
Currently viewing results 1 - 15
PAGE OF 2
Next
Record #:
10110
Author(s):
Abstract:
Stephanie McGarrah, assistant secretary for policy, research and strategic planning at the North Carolina Department of Commerce, and Gene Byrd, the department's director of business retention and development, discuss the effect of the drought on the state's economy.
Source:
Full Text:
Record #:
17557
Abstract:
The water drought that struck North Carolina in the summer spread throughout the state and into the fall. Water supplies dropped for many large cities which prompted emergency ordinances strictly limiting water usage.
Source:
Subject(s):
Record #:
25319
Author(s):
Abstract:
With drought still hanging heavily over communities along the Tar River, it is imperative that the people there employ water conservation methods such as rain harvesting.
Source:
Currents (NoCar TD 171.3 P3 P35x), Vol. 27 Issue 2, Summer 2008, p1, 5
Record #:
25314
Author(s):
Abstract:
Grady McCallie goes over possible solutions to North Carolina’s drought and explains how those solutions need to be taken a step further.
Source:
Currents (NoCar TD 171.3 P3 P35x), Vol. 27 Issue 1, Spring 2008, p1
Record #:
25316
Author(s):
Abstract:
While rains have decreased the drought alert for North Carolina there are still many ideas for water conservation. There are many ideas that have been proposed by the governor, but managing water resources wisely remains the best way to conserve water.
Source:
Currents (NoCar TD 171.3 P3 P35x), Vol. 27 Issue 1, Spring 2008, p6-7, il
Record #:
25325
Author(s):
Abstract:
Ground water and surface water are connected and with an increase in private well use during the drought, the rivers and lakes that provide municipal water could suffer.
Source:
Currents (NoCar TD 171.3 P3 P35x), Vol. 27 Issue 3, Fall 2008, p7
Record #:
26579
Author(s):
Abstract:
Plans to increase groundwater withdrawals and divert surface water to alleviate Tidewater Virginia’s recent water shortage could potentially lower water levels in North Carolina.
Source:
Friend O’ Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 28 Issue 2, Feb 1981, p12
Subject(s):
Record #:
26627
Author(s):
Abstract:
The long-continued and severe drought has inflicted widespread devastation among waterfowl populations in North Carolina. The dry weather has accelerated the loss of wetlands and essential habitat for waterfowl breeding and nesting.
Source:
Friend of Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 35 Issue 6, Nov/Dec 1988, p16-17, il
Subject(s):
Record #:
28085
Author(s):
Abstract:
North Carolina is in the middle of a drought and the state has not done enough to help with the problem. The state needs to do more to educate the citizens of the need to conserve water. Strategic planning for water conservation is also needed at the state and city levels. Releasing press statements and public service announcements is not enough. An in-depth look at the state’s drought and specific details for how the state can conserve water are explored.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 25 Issue 1, January 2008, p13 Periodical Website
Subject(s):
Record #:
28106
Author(s):
Abstract:
As the state’s drought gets worse, the amount of water available is an area of serious concern. The state can only step in to help with a water shortage if there is no water available at local stores and the market cannot support the state’s population. Private water bottling companies pull water from local municipalities and then sell it back to residents at a higher cost. The impact these companies have on the state’s supply and the state's drought plans are detailed in-depth.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 25 Issue 5, January 2008, p14-18 Periodical Website
Subject(s):
Record #:
28108
Author(s):
Abstract:
Raleigh is working hard to develop a plan during this current water crisis. The city council ignored recommendations for a tiered-rate system advised by a task force after droughts in 2002 and 2005. Now, city council members are promising to look at serious conservation policies including a tiered-rate system. The problems with that system and possible solutions to the problem in Raleigh are detailed.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 25 Issue 5, January 2008, p18 Periodical Website
Record #:
28320
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Triangle area is in the middle of a drought and many individuals and local officials are ignoring the problem. Many residents are ignorant of their responsibility to their community. The problem also is showing how the overall demand for water is finally catching up with the supply which has been brought on by increased growth and a lack of planning. Officials need to develop long-term plans to deal with the problem.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 24 Issue 41, October 2007, p17 Periodical Website
Record #:
28357
Author(s):
Abstract:
The citizens of the Triangle area are flunking the water conservation test as the drought goes on. Most of the state and city leaders are failing citizens too. Soon, all residents will have no choice but deal with involuntary water cutbacks if the trends continue. This is the time for leaders and citizens step up and to work together to preserve what water is left.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 24 Issue 51, December 2007, p14-15 Periodical Website
Subject(s):
Record #:
31426
Author(s):
Abstract:
North Carolina farmers have been severely damaged by the summer drought, with estimated losses in the state at more than $300 million. This also impacts consumers because the prices of products that use corn, soybeans and wheat are going to be higher in the months ahead. This has prompted calls by North Carolina congressmen for federal aid to ease the burden.
Source:
Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 15 Issue 10, Oct 1983, p26-27, il
Record #:
33195
Author(s):
Abstract:
The 1985 crop season in North Carolina began extremely dry. Small grains suffered the most early in the season, and continued to deteriorate from drought. The dryness allowed progress in land preparation and early planting of Irish potatoes, cabbage and cool season garden crops.