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64 results for Water supply
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Record #:
15840
Author(s):
Abstract:
As urban areas grow in size and population, they rely more heavily on surrounding rural areas for additional land and water resources. Such a situation has arisen in North Carolina's Chapel Hill-Carrboro area. In the last decade, the population of the area and the number of people served by the Orange Water and Sewer Authority (OWASA) have increased by 33 percent. If the expected growth trend continues the OWASA must locate an additional, reliable source of raw water to meet the projected demands. This is difficult given the rapidly urbanizing areas and also pollution from agricultural land use.
Source:
Carolina Planning (NoCar HT 393 N8 C29x), Vol. 8 Issue 1, Summer 1982, p29-30, f
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Record #:
17548
Abstract:
Growing communities throughout the state required more extensive water and sewage lines to support growing populations. The 1955 Act as part of the General Statutes approved any county to appropriate funds for such development. This act was further clarified in the 1957 Act which grants county officials the right \"to acquire, construct, reconstruct, extend, improve, operate, maintain, lease and dispose of water systems and sanitary sewer systems\" and to contract out such work.
Source:
Popular Government (NoCar JK 4101 P6), Vol. 26 Issue 2, Oct 1959, p10-12, il
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Record #:
17553
Abstract:
This summer's dry weather posed critical tests for municipal water supplies in North Carolina. In some cities plant capacity was not enough to meet the summer's demands. In others the source fell off to such an extent that emergency measures had to be taken.
Source:
Popular Government (NoCar JK 4101 P6), Vol. 18 Issue 2, Oct 1951, pInside cover
Subject(s):
Record #:
17796
Abstract:
Reflecting the recent drought, many North Carolina cities have voted or will soon vote on bond issues to improve their water supply systems.
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Subject(s):
Record #:
18058
Abstract:
This article discusses the public water supply situation in North Carolina as of 1970. Lack of ample sources, small ownership rights, and extreme costs are at the center of the current problems.
Source:
Popular Government (NoCar JK 4101 P6), Vol. 37 Issue 7, Apr 1971, p1-4, 8
Subject(s):
Record #:
18531
Author(s):
Abstract:
Regulating and supplying water to the state's citizens falls to state and local government which faced decreased federal support in the early 1980s. Lacking thorough information about the 500 municipally owned water systems, the author proposed a more detailed study of these systems to better inform future development. Mr. Moreau further suggests more state government involvement intended to give local government more capabilities for managing and planning specific water supplies.
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Subject(s):
Record #:
25249
Author(s):
Abstract:
Greenville Utilities recounts how it selected the site for its Aquifer Storage and Recovery from the first step to the benefits of using such a technology.
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Currents (NoCar TD 171.3 P3 P35x), Vol. 20 Issue 4, Fall 2001, p3, il
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Record #:
25343
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Abstract:
The Riverkeeper gives advice on how to maintain a long-term, sustainable water supply. In addition they cover a plan for how to implement the sustainability.
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Currents (NoCar TD 171.3 P3 P35x), Vol. 28 Issue 4, Winter 2010, p5
Subject(s):
Record #:
25825
Author(s):
Abstract:
North Carolina has long been considered rich in water resources. In the last decade, however, the state has suffered two droughts that have forced cities to implement increasing water restrictions. UNC experts are exploring solutions to water scarcity, such as policy reform, water engineering, and city planning.
Source:
Endeavors (NoCar LD 3941.3 A3), Vol. 24 Issue 3, Spring 2008, p42-46, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
26883
Author(s):
Abstract:
In North Carolina and across the nation, water supplies are in fast decline due to contaminated supplies, inefficient irrigation practices, and polluted groundwater. Plants and animals are even more vulnerable than humans to pollution and water deficits. Thus, wildlife can no longer be left to fend for itself where water is concerned.
Source:
Friend O’ Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 29 Issue 2, Feb 1982, p10
Subject(s):
Record #:
26827
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Abstract:
The nation’s drinking water supply is threatened by chemical contamination from industrial wastes that seep into the waterways. At certain concentrations, contaminants can cause nausea, dizziness, tremors, blindness, and potentially cancer. The Mississippi and Ohio Rivers are among the most polluted waterways.
Source:
Friend O’ Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 28 Issue 7, July 1981, p7
Subject(s):
Record #:
27782
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Abstract:
The North Carolina American Water Works Association (NCAWWA) announced the winners of its annual tap water taste test on Nov. 13. The trade organization awarded Charlotte-Mecklenburg first place, followed by Cary, and Durham. The sources of each town’s water is detailed and what makes each unique and tasty.
Source:
Indy Week (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57), Vol. 29 Issue 47, November 2012, ponline Periodical Website
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Record #:
28106
Author(s):
Abstract:
As the state’s drought gets worse, the amount of water available is an area of serious concern. The state can only step in to help with a water shortage if there is no water available at local stores and the market cannot support the state’s population. Private water bottling companies pull water from local municipalities and then sell it back to residents at a higher cost. The impact these companies have on the state’s supply and the state's drought plans are detailed in-depth.
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Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 25 Issue 5, January 2008, p14-18 Periodical Website
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Record #:
28237
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Abstract:
Hog lagoons or cesspools are the disposal method of waste in the hog industry. However, after 2005, there were no supposed to be any more lagoons in use in the state. The lagoons contaminate groundwater and nearby watersheds and Governor Easely made a deal with industry to do away with the lagoons for a better environmentally and economically feasible method. To date, there has not been an agreed-upon economically feasible method, but some are hoping that research will produce one soon.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 24 Issue 14, April 2007, p23 Periodical Website
Record #:
28320
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Triangle area is in the middle of a drought and many individuals and local officials are ignoring the problem. Many residents are ignorant of their responsibility to their community. The problem also is showing how the overall demand for water is finally catching up with the supply which has been brought on by increased growth and a lack of planning. Officials need to develop long-term plans to deal with the problem.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 24 Issue 41, October 2007, p17 Periodical Website