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8 results for Water--Purification
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Record #:
3450
Author(s):
Abstract:
In 1996, the General Assembly created the N.C. Clean Water Management Trust Fund to deal with water pollution. The fund provides grants to groups for such projects as the restoration of degraded lands and building of riparian buffers.
Source:
Southern City (NoCar Oversize JS 39 S6), Vol. 47 Issue 5, May 1997, p1,12, il, f
Record #:
24818
Author(s):
Abstract:
Barbra Doll, a water protection and restoration specialist, has developed a new technique for filtering sediments and nutrients from runoff. This technique, called regenerative stormwater conveyance has already been applied at some locations and a video demonstration is available. The demonstration was conducted at a family farm in Randolph County.
Source:
Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue 1, Winter 2016, p24-29, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
25831
Author(s):
Abstract:
Waterborne illnesses are a major public health problem in Cambodia, particularly for the rural poor. Doctoral student Joe Brown is trying to help Cambodian people clean their water using a ceramic water filter, locally made from clay, for home use.
Source:
Endeavors (NoCar LD 3941.3 A3), Vol. 23 Issue 1, Fall 2006, p24-25, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
27782
Author(s):
Abstract:
The North Carolina American Water Works Association (NCAWWA) announced the winners of its annual tap water taste test on Nov. 13. The trade organization awarded Charlotte-Mecklenburg first place, followed by Cary, and Durham. The sources of each town’s water is detailed and what makes each unique and tasty.
Source:
Indy Week (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57), Vol. 29 Issue 47, November 2012, ponline Periodical Website
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Record #:
34366
Author(s):
Abstract:
Chlorination of drinking water has been linked to disinfection byproducts (DBPs) that can be harmful to human health. Tackling this problem has created myriad dilemmas for regulatory agencies, utility operations and the public at large. This article discusses the issue in North Carolina, alternative treatment technologies and strategies taken by the City of Durham.
Record #:
33294
Author(s):
Abstract:
Forty-six community water systems monitored by the North Carolina Division of Health Services have naturally occurring levels of radium high enough to violate drinking water standards for groundwater supplies. Operators of these non-compliant water systems must develop a remedial action plan to bring the water supply into compliance with regulatory standards. Several options are discussed in this article.
Record #:
34116
Author(s):
Abstract:
State government in North Carolina has been helping localities protect their water supplies since 1888 when Raleigh enacted special legislation for the protection of Walnut Creek watershed. Since then, water treatment technology has improved water purification but more efforts are needed to protect undeveloped watersheds under multiple jurisdictions. This article provides recommendations for legislative and executive actions to watershed protection.
Record #:
34194
Author(s):
Abstract:
In a project sponsored by the North Carolina Urban Water Consortium, university investigators have concluded that the urban water utilities they studied may need to improve removal of disinfection by-products from drinking water to meet requirements of the Safe Drinking Water Act Amendments of 1986. They also conclude that requirements for removal of synthetic organic chemicals and volatile organic chemicals will probably not have a major impact on the utilities.