NCPI Workmark
Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

Search Results


28 results for Water--Standards
Currently viewing results 1 - 15
PAGE OF 2
Next
Record #:
707
Author(s):
Abstract:
They're the best rivers, creeks, and sounds we've got left, and the Outstanding Resource Waters program gives them some muscular protection.
Full Text:
Record #:
33290
Author(s):
Abstract:
A recent study of streams in the City of Charlotte and Mecklenburg County has found several violations of water quality standards but none that appear to present health risks or impair designated uses of the water. The study was conducted by the United States Geological Survey, Department of the Interior.
Record #:
33294
Author(s):
Abstract:
Forty-six community water systems monitored by the North Carolina Division of Health Services have naturally occurring levels of radium high enough to violate drinking water standards for groundwater supplies. Operators of these non-compliant water systems must develop a remedial action plan to bring the water supply into compliance with regulatory standards. Several options are discussed in this article.
Record #:
33343
Author(s):
Abstract:
Thirty North Carolina communities have expressed a desire to pursue a more protected water supply classification under the new system adopted by the Environmental Management Commission in December. The new system gives greater attention to reducing chemical contaminants that may be the source of chronic diseases. It also increases the level of activity by local governments.
Record #:
33364
Author(s):
Abstract:
A report released by the North Carolina Division of Environmental Management in June offers a detailed assessment of freshwater toxicity of fluoride, sources of fluoride pollution, and the effects on the environment. The report will aid in the development of North Carolina water quality standards for toxicants.
Record #:
33459
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Environmental Protection Agency is enforcing new standards for radionucleotides in response to requirements of the new Safe Drinking Water Act. Twenty-eight public and private water systems in North Carolina have been ordered to comply with radium standards. Research is being conducted on identification of radon in high-risk groundwater areas.
Record #:
33469
Abstract:
This article is a summary of presentations made at the fall Leaders Conference on Groundwater. Speakers discussed North Carolina’s groundwater standards and classifications, and current threats to groundwater quality.
Record #:
33490
Author(s):
Abstract:
In March the Environmental Management Commission ruled that municipalities and industrial operations which discharge treated wastewater into Falls and Jordan Lakes must reduce phosphorus levels by 1990. Falls and Jordan Lakes were declared nutrient-sensitive in 1983, and stringent regulations were imposed to control the growth of algae in the lakes. A lower phosphorus standard will make it more feasible to employ biological, rather than chemical, methods to remove phosphorus.
Record #:
33493
Author(s):
Abstract:
Legislation was introduced in the North Carolina General Assembly to establish a commission to study the issue of watershed protection standards. The bill was prompted by concerns among Raleigh city officials about pollution threats to Falls Lake, the main source of drinking water for Raleigh and much of Wake County. The proposed commission would investigate the need for watershed development standards beyond a local basis.
Record #:
33582
Author(s):
Abstract:
North Carolina communities are acting to protect the streams and reservoirs they rely on for drinking water by requesting reclassification of their water supplies under the North Carolina Water Supply Protection Program. The new system has three water supply classes defined by the amount and types of permitted wastewater discharges and requirements for nonpoint source controls in the watershed. Various departments of State government are offering technical assistance, and land use and economic information.
Record #:
33585
Author(s):
Abstract:
The North Carolina Environmental Management Commission voted in January to classify the lower Neuse River Basin as nutrient sensitive waters. This decision makes the reduction of phosphorus mandatory at the municipal and industrial wastewater treatment facilities. Specific nutrient management strategies have been developed for point and nonpoint source control of nutrients.
Record #:
34116
Author(s):
Abstract:
State government in North Carolina has been helping localities protect their water supplies since 1888 when Raleigh enacted special legislation for the protection of Walnut Creek watershed. Since then, water treatment technology has improved water purification but more efforts are needed to protect undeveloped watersheds under multiple jurisdictions. This article provides recommendations for legislative and executive actions to watershed protection.
Record #:
34143
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Legislative Research Commission’s Committee on Watershed Protection has recommended to the 1989 General Assembly two bills aimed at providing reliable and safe water supplies. The bills outline standards for point and nonpoint pollution controls and propose the development of a state water supply plan.
Record #:
34147
Author(s):
Abstract:
To resolve disagreement about stringent limitations on toxic substances in North Carolina’s streams and rivers, the Environmental Management Commission appointed a committee to review the state’s proposed new in-stream water quality standards prior to taking the standards to public hearing. The dispute about state standards reflects widespread controversy about both analytical detection limits and public risk-benefit perception.
Record #:
34146
Author(s):
Abstract:
The North Carolina Department of Natural Resources and Community Development may be scheduling public hearings on surface water reclassification requests in the first half of 1989. Some communities have requested a more protective classification of existing water supplies. Others have asked that surface waters now classified for recreation, trout, or other uses be reclassified so that they can be used for public water supplies.