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29 results for Water resources development
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Record #:
12447
Author(s):
Abstract:
This article features communities that successfully integrated water resource management into urban sustainability efforts.
Source:
Carolina Planning (NoCar HT 393 N8 C29x), Vol. 35 Issue , Summer 2010, p31-42, map, f
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Record #:
28395
Abstract:
Natural water gathering in two newly discovered Carolina bays, designated as Oak Bay and Pine Bay was studied. These bays and the Sewee shell ring, a planned water gathering system built in the Archaic Period, provided a supply of freshwater. This study describes how hunter-gatherers utilized natural landscape features at these coastal archaeological sites.
Record #:
31362
Author(s):
Abstract:
A task force at North Carolina State University has identified more than a dozen ways in which science education can help citizens stretch and protect water supplies. They urged that more consideration be given to irrigating crops with wastewater, and that continued efforts be made to reduce water usage in the pulp, paper and food processing industries.
Source:
Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 16 Issue 8, Aug 1984, p10-11, il Periodical Website
Record #:
32441
Abstract:
For the past few years, there has been debate over a proposal to dam the New River in northwestern North Carolina for hydroelectric power. The dam could also create a major tourist attraction, and supply water for Greensboro, High Point, and Winston-Salem.
Source:
We the People of North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 33 Issue 12, Dec 1975, p37-38, por, map
Record #:
32942
Author(s):
Abstract:
North Carolina has vast supplies of underground water aquifers. As the population and industry development rise, there is concern about how to protect water resources from pollution. Without proper control, runoff of phosphorus and other nutrients can cause excessive growth of unwanted algae.
Source:
Record #:
33165
Author(s):
Abstract:
The provision of water supplies of ample quantity and quality to sustain population growth and economic development can no longer be taken for granted. North Carolina is experiencing interstate competition for water, and a more active state role in planning for water supplies is in order.
Record #:
33292
Author(s):
Abstract:
The North Carolina Division of Water Resources estimates that almost three-hundred-million gallons of water are being saved each year through leak detection measures being used by local water supply systems in North Carolina. A recent report shows that the leak detection program has saved over two-hundred-thousand dollars since 1983.
Record #:
33295
Author(s):
Abstract:
Six communities in southwestern Wake County have expressed a desire to use water from Jordan Lake. Jordan Lake has a long history of debate over its quality as a source of drinking water. The Environmental Management Commission will decide how to allocate water from the lake based on studies and requests.
Record #:
33358
Author(s):
Abstract:
Speaking before the Water Resources Congress in June, Secretary S. Thomas Rhodes, North Carolina Department of Natural Resources and Community Development, described some of the major water resource management issues in North Carolina. Among the issues are protection of water supply watersheds, coastal water quality, and financing wastewater treatment facilities.
Record #:
33462
Abstract:
This article is a summary of presentations made at the September 16 Leaders Conference on Groundwater. Representatives discussed municipal concerns, local government concerns, and industry concerns about groundwater in North Carolina.
Record #:
33461
Author(s):
Abstract:
The continuing resolution budget signed by President Reagan in October included a two-million-dollar appropriation to pay for the Randleman Dam project on the Deep River in Randolph and Guilford Counties. The project is being touted as the most cost-effective way to provide water for the counties.
Record #:
33469
Abstract:
This article is a summary of presentations made at the fall Leaders Conference on Groundwater. Speakers discussed North Carolina’s groundwater standards and classifications, and current threats to groundwater quality.
Record #:
33494
Author(s):
Abstract:
In May, the North Carolina Environmental Management Commission proposed regulations for allocating water supply from Jordan Lake. The rules set out a process to guide water supply allocation but do not allocate the water to specific users. The proposed rule would also require that fifty-percent of the water supply remain unallocated in first-round allocations.
Record #:
33542
Author(s):
Abstract:
To protect the largest stand of maritime forest left on the Outer Banks and the Cape Hatteras Aquifer, which provides water to most of the residents in the area, the North Carolina Division of Coastal Management has proposed designating the Buxton Woods area as an Area of Environmental Concern. The designation would restrict development in Buxton Woods, and the proposal has created controversy.
Record #:
33548
Author(s):
Abstract:
A study by the North Carolina Division of Water Resources says that anticipated industrial development and increased agricultural irrigation could have a heavy impact on surface water resources in the Dan River Basin over the next three decades. Development of water resources in the basin must be carefully planned to maintain adequate streamflows and water quality.