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25 results for Water management
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Record #:
15993
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Abstract:
Urban sprawl, fragmented natural areas, and polluted air, soil, and water challenge urban and regional planners throughout the world. Water and nature management is exceedingly difficult because these resources have multiple uses, are impacted by numerous pollution sources, and intersect jurisdictional boundaries. The traditional environmental planning approach to these problems is based on the separation of urban, rural, and environmental functions and tends to focus on the protection of natural areas. However, this is not a sustainable method of planning. Therefore, planning must seek to achieve a better balance between ecosystem and watershed integrity and the provision of human, social, and economic services. In order to accomplish this, planning must recognize that problems with water and natural areas are interrelated.
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Carolina Planning (NoCar HT 393 N8 C29x), Vol. 26 Issue 2, Summer 2001, p27-45, bibl, f
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Record #:
17560
Author(s):
Abstract:
Growing populations across the state strained municipal utilities. Greater population densities in the cities where industrial jobs attracted formerly agricultural workers demanded developed and more extensive water and sewage capacities in the state's cities. Data pertaining to sewage and water facility development is compiled for the years 1954 through 1960.
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Popular Government (NoCar JK 4101 P6), Vol. 26 Issue 6-7, Mar-Apr 1960, p6-9, 24, il
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Record #:
17655
Abstract:
A questionnaire was distributed to farmers, industrial facilities, and others throughout fourteen Piedmont cities. The questionnaire was part of a study to examine adherence to water laws, impediments created by these laws, and the cost to the consumer. Those administering and recording the results of this study hoped to determine a more efficient water legislation plan in the face of technological changes and increased strain on the resource because of growing populations in the region.
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Popular Government (NoCar JK 4101 P6), Vol. 28 Issue 5-6, Mar-Apr 1962, p13-15, il
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Record #:
17682
Author(s):
Abstract:
Jacksonville resident relied on the Castle Hayne, a natural limestone formation, for their water supply. Additional wells were added to the system in the 1940s with the influx of military personnel and their families to Camp Lejeune. Further updates in the 1960s included increasing the number of wells but also adding facilities to soften the limestone filtered water to improve taste and reduce smell.
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Popular Government (NoCar JK 4101 P6), Vol. 29 Issue 7-8, Apr-May 1963, p15-16, 20
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Record #:
18416
Abstract:
Morgan outlines the problems confronting North Carolina local governments in the face of declining federal funds for water and waste water facilities, examines possible new directions for state and local policy, and evaluates the usefulness of various financing options in meeting the needs of state and local government.
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Popular Government (NoCar JK 4101 P6), Vol. 51 Issue 4, Spring 1986, p44-56
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Record #:
25255
Author(s):
Abstract:
Carolyn Smith details the regulations for surface water transfer and what the documentation of such includes.
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Currents (NoCar TD 171.3 P3 P35x), Vol. 21 Issue 2, Spring 2002, p5
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Record #:
25256
Author(s):
Abstract:
Paul Blount describes Rocky Mount’s drinking water treatment plants and how that ties in with the reservoir and the wastewater treatment plant. More users of the water are needed in order to release the 50 million gallons a day required to keep the constant flow in the river downstream.
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Currents (NoCar TD 171.3 P3 P35x), Vol. 21 Issue 2, Spring 2002, p7, il
Record #:
25272
Author(s):
Abstract:
After talking with Larry Thomas, the Director of Public Works for the City of Oxford, Mary Alsentzer describes what is needed for the Oxford wastewater treatment plant.
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Currents (NoCar TD 171.3 P3 P35x), Vol. 22 Issue 2, Spring 2003, p4, il, por
Record #:
26382
Author(s):
Abstract:
Recent proposals have suggested a state, regional, or river basin authority for water management in North Carolina. Proposals however, vary between emphasis on local governments versus those that would place less weight on the local component of management.
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Friend O’ Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 23 Issue (26) 1, Winter 1979, p26
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Record #:
26843
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Abstract:
Several state affiliates of the National Wildlife Federation are working with the Washington D.C. office to curtail federal spending for pork barrel water projects. Some of the projects are unnecessary, expensive and environmentally destructive.
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Friend O’ Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 28 Issue 9, Sept 1981, p2, il
Subject(s):
Record #:
27803
Author(s):
Abstract:
Rules to cleanup Falls Lake are set, but the important source of water remains a mess. The water is not swimmable or drinkable and does not meet water quality standards set by the EPA. Raleigh and Durham are fighting over who is responsible and who will pay for the cleanup. Durham questions whether the cleanup is worth the cost and Raleigh supports the cleanup and plan as Falls Lake supplies water to the city. The details of the plan, the history of the disaster, and the fight over it are explained.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 28 Issue 18, May 2011, p14-17 Periodical Website
Record #:
28948
Author(s):
Abstract:
North Carolina local officials are at a crossroads in growth management, in financing new water and sewer projects, and in land use regulations. This article discusses how intergovernmental relationships are growing more complex, as are technical issues.
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NC Insight (NoCar JK 4101 .N3x), Vol. 7 Issue 1, June 1984, p66-74, il, f
Record #:
28973
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Abstract:
The Nile Project is a collective of musicians from countries along the Nile River. The project aims to highlight issues of water use around the globe and to find better ways of managing water resources. North Carolina State LIVE is bringing the Nile Project to Raleigh for a week of programming that includes a concert, a documentary screening, discussions, and a culminating festival.
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Indy Week (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57), Vol. 34 Issue 9, March 2017, p16-18, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
29077
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Abstract:
Water levels are declining in North Carolina’s rivers and streams due to increased development and water withdrawals, as well as climate change. The biggest concerns are over the availability of drinking water and pollution. Environmentalists say the state should toughen the requirements on permits for withdrawals to reflect the lower water flow.
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Indy Week (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57), Vol. 34 Issue 24, July 2017, p8, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
31292
Author(s):
Abstract:
According to the Wake County Cooperative Extension office, water quality across North Carolina is good, even in rural areas, despite the possibility of a lurking problem in groundwater under rural farmland treated with pesticides years ago. This article discusses water quality issues in the state and offers a guide to maintaining private well water.
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