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15 results for Goldsmith, Thomas
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17862
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In his professional life, musician Jim Mills spent fourteen years as a Grammy-winning, banjo-playing sideman to bluegrass legend Ricky Skaggs. But in his personal life, Mills is known for the banjo room in his Durham home--the world's largest collection of Gibson historic banjos.
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28949
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Hours before a federal judge halted President Donald Trump’s refugee ban Saturday, thousands gathered in Raleigh to protest in a rally. Speakers who addressed the crowd talked about a number of issues surrounding current policies, ethnicity and race.
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Indy Week (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57), Vol. 34 Issue 4, Feb 2017, p8, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
28981
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Widely publicized immigration sweeps, anti-immigrant rhetoric on the state and national levels, and a stream of proposed new laws targeting the undocumented have put immigrants in North Carolina at unease. In Wake County, undocumented residents question whether to report crimes because doing so might lead to their deportation.
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Indy Week (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57), Vol. 34 Issue 10, March 2017, p16-18, por Periodical Website
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28979
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For centuries, North Carolina has leaned on the labor and initiative of immigrants from across the globe. James H. Johnson, a professor at University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill’s Kenan-Flagler Business School, covers the history and patterns of immigration in North Carolina.
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Indy Week (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57), Vol. 34 Issue 10, March 2017, p10-11, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
28990
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Daniel Eller, Chapel Hill-Carrboro Chamber’s 2015 Young Professional of the Year, is moving low-income residents out of subsidized housing in Garner. The residents have expressed concerns about having to relocate prior to the end of the current school year and the impact this could have on students. They are also worried about finding new homes that they can afford.
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Indy Week (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57), Vol. 34 Issue 11, March 2017, p8-9, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
29000
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Wake County schools have requested an extra fifty-six million dollars, partly to offset an unfunded class-size mandated by the North Carolina General Assembly. If the money is approved by the school board and county commission, there would be a fourteen-percent increase over the county taxpayers’ budget.
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Indy Week (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57), Vol. 34 Issue 13, April 2017, p8, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
29008
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In North Carolina, the cost of inmates' hospital care is increasingly falling on the shoulders of county taxpayers, as mandated by a 2013 state law. Wake County officials say this is another example of the legislature shifting the burden of services to local governments.
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Indy Week (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57), Vol. 34 Issue 14, April 2017, p12-15, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
29051
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Controversy over the generations-old practice of hunting deer with dogs continues in North Carolina, even though a bill designed to regulate it has been stalled in a House committee since April. House Bill 648 was introduced to create a framework for resolving some disputes between hunters, landowners, and animal rights advocates.
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Indy Week (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57), Vol. 34 Issue 21, June 2017, p8-9, il Periodical Website
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29056
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A Faith Advocacy rally was held in Raleigh to show opposition to anti-immigration legislation, including a bill that would deny tax revenue to cities that accept non-government IDs. Reverend William J. Barber II, a civil rights leader, spoke at the rally in support of an immigrant family threatened to be deported.
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Indy Week (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57), Vol. 34 Issue 22, June 2017, p8, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
29077
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Water levels are declining in North Carolina’s rivers and streams due to increased development and water withdrawals, as well as climate change. The biggest concerns are over the availability of drinking water and pollution. Environmentalists say the state should toughen the requirements on permits for withdrawals to reflect the lower water flow.
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Indy Week (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57), Vol. 34 Issue 24, July 2017, p8, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
29094
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To mitigate the effects that large infill houses may have on adjacent homes, the city's unified development ordinance limits the height of new construction close to a home of more than twenty years’ existence. In a mid-century Raleigh neighborhood, developers are constructing houses that violate those limits.
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Indy Week (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57), Vol. 34 Issue 26, July 2017, p10-11, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
29091
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The Wake County Board of Commissioners received a report from a 2016 Wake County Commission for Women study on women's employment issues. The results show major gender-based wage gaps among employees in Wake County.
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Indy Week (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57), Vol. 34 Issue 26, July 2017, p7, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
39864
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Huddie Ledbetter, later known as Lead Belly, grew up in the south and eventually became part of a trio with John and Alan Lomax, a father-son team of song collectors. Lead Belly collected, wrote, and sang songs in several different styles, including Blues. He is also credited with helping to define American vernacular music in the 20th century.
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39661
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Leroy Smith began making a name for himself in the bluegrass music scene in the mid-1960s and has continued to perform and compose music since then.
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28967
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Raleigh’s historic Maiden Lane was born in the shadow of North Carolina State University, and part of a history steeped in fraternity parties and punk rock music. Despite its history, much of Maiden Lane will be re-developed into an apartment complex called Hillstone Cameron Village.
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Indy Week (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57), Vol. 33 Issue 7, March 2017, p12-14, il, map Periodical Website
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