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9 results for Wake County Schools
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Record #:
27895
Author(s):
Abstract:
Wake County’s school system no longer has a diversity policy. Now, the challenge is to assign Wake County’s students to specific schools by re-drawing lines. If all students went to their local neighborhood schools, the schools would be over-crowded. Some are afraid that the school system will have the same problems Charlotte had when they got rid of their diversity plan. Some fear Wake County schools will become re-segregated and minorities and low-income students will suffer the most.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 27 Issue 13, March 2010, p11-12 Periodical Website
Record #:
27913
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Wake County School board is struggling to create a new student assignment plan. Leaders say the plan should reflect the county’s values, stable assignments for kids, choices for parents, efficient use of schools, and diversity in school populations. An outline of the plan was presented at a recent meeting which included dividing the county into regions and assignment zones from which parents can choose the schools their children will attend. Specific details of the plan and the reaction to it are explored.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 27 Issue 16, April 2010, p9-10 Periodical Website
Record #:
27970
Author(s):
Abstract:
The actions of the “Majority-5” bloc of the Wake County school board are prompting protests. The school board recently voted to eliminate diversity as a criteria for school placements. The board has claimed that this will help low-income students who were being neglected under the diversity mandate. The facts suggest that the new school assignment system will further hurt low-income minority students. The “Majority-5” are members from mostly upper-middle class, white, suburban areas of Raleigh and the other four school board members represent the city center and mostly poorer, minority students.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 27 Issue 29, July 2010, p7 Periodical Website
Record #:
28224
Author(s):
Abstract:
Wake County’s schools are at the breaking point. The school system is struggling to cope with the growth the county has seen in recent years. The system does not have enough schools to meet student enrollment and the commissioners oppose new revenue sources which would raise money for the schools and scheduling changes which help ease the burden. Proposed details of a new school bond, the root of the problem, and what the county commissioners and school board believe should be done to solve the problem, are detailed.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 24 Issue 9, February 2007, p16-20 Periodical Website
Record #:
28198
Author(s):
Abstract:
Wake County Commissioners are not serving student and school needs in Wake County. The new Republican majority has not honored promises made to be a bipartisan body and proposed a second bond referendum in one year. Wake County needs more schools, but the commissioners are trying to make this happen in the wrong way.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 24 Issue 6, February 2007, p17 Periodical Website
Record #:
28301
Author(s):
Abstract:
Derek Jennings discusses the reasons for why he and his wife decided to homeschool their three youngest children. Jennings decided that homeschooling was a better option to meet each of his children’s individual needs than their current situation in Wake County Schools. The apprehension and curiosity that came with the decision were well rewarded as all three of his children are doing better emotionally and educationally in the homeschool environment than they were in public schools. Many families in Wake County are choosing this option with the school population explosion.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 24 Issue 34, August 2007, p14 Periodical Website
Record #:
29000
Author(s):
Abstract:
Wake County schools have requested an extra fifty-six million dollars, partly to offset an unfunded class-size mandated by the North Carolina General Assembly. If the money is approved by the school board and county commission, there would be a fourteen-percent increase over the county taxpayers’ budget.
Source:
Indy Week (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57), Vol. 34 Issue 13, April 2017, p8, il Periodical Website
Full Text:
Record #:
34539
Author(s):
Abstract:
The North Carolina State Museum of Natural Sciences has developed a new program called Project Chimney Swift. With their help, students at a local middle school began observing the behavior of chimney swift birds and even installed an experimental nesting tower at the museum. They hope this will encourage swift habitat preservation and add to what very little is known about these birds.
Source:
Record #:
34567
Author(s):
Abstract:
The North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences teamed up with students at Broughton High School in Raleigh to create a new program designed to help students move beyond their normal biology course. The program allows students to come to the museum every other day, assist with education and outreach, and conserve and inventory specimens.
Source:
North Carolina Naturalist (NoCar QH 76.5 N8 N68), Vol. 9 Issue 1, Spring/Summer 2001, p14-17, il, por