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12 results for Kemp, Karen
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Record #:
3526
Author(s):
Abstract:
Dr. Wayne Starnes is the N.C. State Museum of Natural Sciences' first full-time curator of fishes in the 118-year history of the institution. With over 700,000 marine and freshwater specimens, it is the nation's fifth-largest regional collection.
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North Carolina Naturalist (NoCar QH 76.5 N8 N68), Vol. 5 Issue 1, Spring/Summer 1997, p2-9, il, por
Record #:
3524
Author(s):
Abstract:
The bog turtle, the smallest and rarest turtle in the country, has been nominated for Endangered Species Act protection. There are more bog turtles and sites in the state than in all other Southern states combined.
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Subject(s):
Record #:
3662
Author(s):
Abstract:
Project Chimney Swift is a cooperative effort between three Wake County schools - Ligon, Martin, and Davis Drive - and the N.C. State Museum of Natural Sciences to study the birds' use of school chimneys. Observations will be shared on a World Wide Web site.
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Record #:
3768
Author(s):
Abstract:
Staff members of the North Carolina State Museum of Natural Sciences not only collect birds but they also conduct field studies. For example, the museum undertook a study with N.C. State University, Westvaco Corp., and International Paper to see how wildlife is affected by timber management.
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Record #:
20852
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Abstract:
Willo, scientific name Thescelosaurus, is the best preserved dinosaur for its species. It has a complete skull and soft tissues which are usually lost to decay. The creature, an herbivore, was about three feet tall at the hip, weighed some six hundred pounds, and was twelve to thirteen feet long. What makes Willo unique was that its discovery revealed something that was considered undiscoverable--a fossilized organ--in this case a dinosaur heart. Friends of the North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences purchased Willo for $350,000, but it is estimated now to be worth ten times that because of the heart discovery.
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North Carolina Naturalist (NoCar QH 76.5 N8 N68), Vol. 8 Issue 2, Fall/Win 2000, p1-8, il, por
Subject(s):
Record #:
20843
Author(s):
Abstract:
Mary Kay Clark, curator of mammals at the North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences, is the state's most active field researcher on bats. There are fifteen resident bat species in the state and about half of them live in caves or mines. The work of Clark and her assistants focuses on two rare and little-known forest-dwellers--the southeastern myotis and the big-eared bat.
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North Carolina Naturalist (NoCar QH 76.5 N8 N68), Vol. 7 Issue 2, Fall/Win 1999, p2-7, il
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Record #:
20853
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Abstract:
Kemp examines how non-indigenous species are endangering the natives in North Carolina and beyond. For example, flathead catfish eat native fishes or their food, hydrilla plants overtake lakes, and kudzu covers every bare spot in sight. She describes characteristics of the invaders and presents seven things individuals can do to help control them.
Source:
North Carolina Naturalist (NoCar QH 76.5 N8 N68), Vol. 9 Issue 2, Fall/Win 2001, p2-8, il, por, map
Subject(s):
Record #:
20978
Author(s):
Abstract:
Honeybees are in trouble nationwide. Over 90 percent of the feral bee colonies have been decimated, and the state's managed colonies have declined about 50 percent since the 1980s. Kemp examines some of the reasons for this. Pollination for crops is essential and farmers have to import colonies during the blooming season. Kemp discusses the benefits of backyard beekeeping.
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North Carolina Naturalist (NoCar QH 76.5 N8 N68), Vol. 14 Issue 2, Sum 2006, p9-11, il
Record #:
4622
Author(s):
Abstract:
Built in 1879, the North Carolina Museum of Natural Science existed for over a century in cramped quarters. Now the Raleigh museum has moved into a 200,000-square-foot, $71 million structure that is being called the premier natural science museum in the Southeast.
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Record #:
34541
Author(s):
Abstract:
The North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences is involved with several different research projects around the state. Bird banding, bird counting by identifying songs, nest monitoring, and territory mapping are among the ongoing projects that are conducted with the help of North Carolina State University students. The techniques will help in another collaborative project investing the effect of forested corridors on bird species.
Source:
North Carolina Naturalist (NoCar QH 76.5 N8 N68), Vol. 6 Issue 1, Spring/Summer 1998, p8-9, il, f
Record #:
34539
Author(s):
Abstract:
The North Carolina State Museum of Natural Sciences has developed a new program called Project Chimney Swift. With their help, students at a local middle school began observing the behavior of chimney swift birds and even installed an experimental nesting tower at the museum. They hope this will encourage swift habitat preservation and add to what very little is known about these birds.
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Record #:
34574
Author(s):
Abstract:
The North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences has begun breeding a special species of seahorse. Hippocampus erectus, one of two native species to North Carolina, have dwindled in number in the wild. The breeding program will not only help bolster the exhibits here in North Carolina, but also afford the opportunity to trade with other museums for live animals that are not on exhibit at the museum.
Source:
North Carolina Naturalist (NoCar QH 76.5 N8 N68), Vol. 11 Issue 3, Win 2003, p11-14, il, por