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12 results for Beekeeping
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Record #:
14415
Abstract:
The business of keeping bees involves a slight occupational hazard: you have to risk getting stung now and again. That's one reason why C. C. Thompson of State Road, near Elkin, North Carolina, has practically no competition.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 15 Issue 19, Oct 1947, p8, f
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Record #:
15064
Abstract:
Mr. F. R. Jordan, who lives in the Castle Hayne section of New Hanover County, enjoys the distinction of being the biggest bee-grower in North Carolina. He has more than 200,000,000 bees working for him to produce honey in large quantities.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 8 Issue 20, Oct 1940, p9, 30, f
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Record #:
20978
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Honeybees are in trouble nationwide. Over 90 percent of the feral bee colonies have been decimated, and the state's managed colonies have declined about 50 percent since the 1980s. Kemp examines some of the reasons for this. Pollination for crops is essential and farmers have to import colonies during the blooming season. Kemp discusses the benefits of backyard beekeeping.
Source:
North Carolina Naturalist (NoCar QH 76.5 N8 N68), Vol. 14 Issue 2, Sum 2006, p9-11, il
Record #:
23654
Abstract:
Beekeepers Kelley Penn and Quintin Ellison of Balltown Bee Farm discuss the importance of honeybees and how they produce sourwood honey.
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Record #:
26733
Abstract:
North Carolina has more beekeepers than any state in the country. The state offers a variety of flavors of honey based on the regional plants. In particular, the sourwood variety of the mountains and foothills of North Carolina is one of the most treasured flavors of honey in the world.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 84 Issue 3, August 2016, p104-106, 108, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
28023
Abstract:
Chapel Hill resident and beekeeper Liz Lindsey is folklorist who is part of a new generation of beekeepers. The new generation is younger, female, and urban. Males tend to dominate the field, but that is changing. Beekeeping in the state of North Carolina and the various reasons women are being drawn to beekeeping are discussed.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 27 Issue 39, September 2010, p31 Periodical Website
Record #:
31161
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North Carolina benefits from having more than ten-thousand beekeepers, more than any state in the nation. The state also ranks among the top ten in number of beehives, and most of these belong to hobbyists with a passion for keeping bees. This article discusses the history of beekeeping, the importance of bees in pollination, and the production of honey.
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Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 35 Issue 8, Aug 2003, p22-23, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
31484
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Abstract:
North Carolina has the largest beekeepers’ association in the United States. A Master Beekeeper program will be launched in North Carolina this fall, sponsored by the North Carolina Agricultural Extension Service and the North Carolina State Beekeepers Association. Individuals will have the opportunity to attend training courses and then take exams to qualify for one of five certification levels.
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Record #:
34823
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Abstract:
Gary Pierce, a North Carolina resident, decided to begin beekeeping to help support local farms. In North Carolina, crop pollination is heavily reliant on individuals with small scale beekeeping (less than twenty five hives). As bees are important to the state, there are several beekeepers who are employed as hive inspectors. These individuals visit hives and aid in running diagnostic tests. Pierce had several issues with one hive which necessitated a visit from the inspector. While the visit was not successful, Pierce concludes that bees remain an important aspect of the North Carolina economy. All in all, he believes that beekeeping is worth the sting.
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Record #:
36848
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Charles Heatherly became a beekeeper when his source for his favorite type of honey was no longer available. In this interview, he explains the workings of bee culture, and how to harvest honey and cultivate their natural resources. “Stella Daniel’s Orange Carrot Cake” recipe is included at the end of the article.
Record #:
36589
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Sharing genetic material with the Scutellata, the bees Sean Collingsworth keeps are the Italian and Carniolan varieties. His relatively harmless hive dwellers, supping on nectar untainted by pesticides, produce what he touted as honey high in quality because of its purity.
Record #:
36585
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Abstract:
The movement encouraging a deeper connection to and respect for nature has generated the combination of agriculture and neighborhoods. The profile agrihood, Olivette, facilitates eco-sensitive practices such as permaculture to protect existing species and promote responsible stewardship of the land.