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12 results for Pesticides--Environmental aspects
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Record #:
1331
Author(s):
Abstract:
The N.C. Pesticide Board has developed the Generic Pesticide State Management Plan (SMP) to manage pesticides the U.S. EPA designates as threats to North Carolina's groundwater.
Record #:
1902
Author(s):
Abstract:
Pesticides provide many benefits, such as increased crop production and insect reduction, but at the same time cause health problems and environmental damage. Governmental agencies must consider these factors in regulating the use of pesticides.
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Record #:
2598
Author(s):
Abstract:
Concern of Watauga County farmers about childhood leukemia brought a change in pesticide and herbicide use. Crop and Christmas tree yields are up, wildlife has increased, and the leukemia rate has fallen in six years.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 63 Issue 6, Nov 1995, p3, il, bibl
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Record #:
9726
Author(s):
Abstract:
Beginning in the 1940s, widespread use of DDT and other pesticides had a disastrous effect on wildfowl reproduction. In North Carolina eagles were wiped out and ospreys all but exterminated. Lake Ellis and Orton Pond were two osprey sites which escaped serious infestation of pesticides. While osprey populations are again on the rise, severe weather, predators, and habitat destruction can limit the survival of a number of fledglings.
Record #:
25266
Author(s):
Abstract:
There are many controversies involving aerial pesticide spraying. The real question is what to do about it and who is responsible for enforcing any rules about it.
Source:
Currents (NoCar TD 171.3 P3 P35x), Vol. 22 Issue 1, Winter 2003, p11, il, por
Record #:
25742
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Pesticide Board will discuss a citizen request to restrict or ban the use of daminozide, which is sprayed on apples to make them redder, firmer, and more uniform. Research studies suggest that daminozide causes cancer. Despite 350 complaints of pesticide misuse in the last three and a half years, not one applicator or dealer has had their license permanently revoked.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 5 Issue 4, Feb 26-March 11 1987, p7-11, por Periodical Website
Record #:
26084
Author(s):
Abstract:
During preliminary research, North Carolina State University biologists have recently discovered pesticides in quail and rabbits. They are still investigating the effects of the exposure on wildlife.
Source:
Friend O’ Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 21 Issue 2, Mar-Apr 1977, p20, 27
Record #:
30084
Abstract:
The Neuse River Waterdog (Necturus lewisi) is a large, aquatic salamander endemic to the Neuse and Tar River systems of North Carolina. Some of the streams inhabited by the salamander drain lands subject to frequent pesticide applications. This paper reports the results of analysis of tissues to determine pesticide and polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) residue levels.
Source:
Brimleyana (NoCar QL 155 B75), Vol. Issue 10, Feb 1985, p107-109, bibl Periodical Website
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Record #:
34235
Author(s):
Abstract:
In October, the North Carolina Pesticide Board reviewed an evaluation of the state’s pesticide regulation program conducted by the North Carolina Center for Public Policy Research and watched a videotape on aerial application of pesticides, a primary target of the policy center’s criticism. The study concludes that the state needs to curb violations by crop dusters and exterminators, assess harsher fines on repeat violators, and achieve more balance on the boards that oversee pesticide use.
Record #:
34258
Author(s):
Abstract:
The North Carolina Pesticide Board has approved and released its “Interagency Study of the Impact of Pesticide Use on Ground Water in North Carolina”. The study was initiated in 1987 to determine if labeled uses of pesticide products are impacting the groundwater resources in the state. A summary of the results from monitoring wells are provided in this article.
Record #:
36589
Author(s):
Abstract:
Sharing genetic material with the Scutellata, the bees Sean Collingsworth keeps are the Italian and Carniolan varieties. His relatively harmless hive dwellers, supping on nectar untainted by pesticides, produce what he touted as honey high in quality because of its purity.
Record #:
36564
Author(s):
Abstract:
The author defined GMOs’ complexity by examining their crisis inducing potential, illustrated by incidents such as an increase in gastrointestinal disorders, allergies, and infertility. People may counter the crisis by endorsing crop variety, advocating small-scale farmers, increasing local food production and consumption, and decreasing fertilizer use. Until the crisis passes, the author recommended avoiding GMOs by growing foods and purchasing certified organic foods. As for the difference between non-GMO and organic, Figart noted organic foods do not contain GMOs and are not exposed to pesticides.